Rebels, Bandits, Frauds, Charlatans and Other Wicked Men in the works of Flavius Josephus

In this guest post, David Blocker presents a table (attached here) in which he compares all the descriptions of the so-called “Wicked Men” found in Josephus’ works, including also the description of Jesus known as the Testimonium Flavianum. Blocker’s idea (borrowed from Thackeray) that Josephus had two Greek speaking assistants who were responsible for quite a lot of the stuff present in his historical works is interesting, as is his conclusion that the Testimonium Flavianum deviates from the other descriptions of “wicked men” found in Josephus and accordingly is a later addition to the Antiquities of the Jews. Over to Blocker …

 

Rebels, Bandits, Frauds, Charlatans and Other Wicked Men in the works of Flavius Josephus

A Repetitive Literary Formula That Confirms the Testimonium Flavianum is an Interpolation

 A Guest Post by David Blocker 

Scattered throughout the historical and autobiographical works attributed to Flavius Josephus[1], are short narrations describing the rise and fall of the rebels, bandits (Greek: lestai), charlatans, frauds and impostors (Greek: gontes) who plagued 1st century Judea. Flavius Josephus believed these men were responsible for the outbreak of the Jewish revolt that led to the subjugation and destruction of his beloved Jerusalem[2].

These narrations can be categorized into two distinct groups

One group occurs early in Jewish War and the corresponding section of Antiquities of the Jews. These are brief summaries of the careers of assorted insurgents who were usually reported to possess great physical strength and a great desire for attaining “kingship” or “royal prerogative”[3]. Other than these two features, these descriptions do not adhere to a standardized literary format.

The second group of descriptions of Rebels, Bandits, Frauds, Charlatans and Other Wicked Men were written using a standardized literary formula. The Wicked Man was introduced and his career was recounted according to a standard pattern: the troublemaker was named or described, followed by a brief account of how he made extravagant claims or promises in order to attract disciples, whom he then led into peril. When the troublemaker and his dupes came to the attention of the Judean and Roman authorities, they were summarily dealt with and usually came to a violent end. This repeated narrative formula is used in the Jewish War, Antiquities of the Jews, and in Josephus’ Vita.

Book 18 of Antiquities of the Jews contains passages that briefly describe the activities of Jesus[4] and John the Baptist[5]. The paragraph about Jesus in Antiquities of the Jews is called the Testimonium Flavianum. These passages, at least on first glance appear, to have been written using the literary formula that was used to describe the activities of Josephus’ Wicked Men.

I assembled a table using all the examples of the Wicked Men literary formula in the works ascribed to Flavius Josephus. Each column of the table contains a passage from the works of Flavius Josephus describing the activities of a troublemaker. The passages have been broken down into smaller blocks of text which deal with particular topics or contain words which are shared by other Wicked Men narratives. These blocks of text can be arranged into parallel rows. The blocks of text within a row share common features which are listed in the cells of the first column of the table. The table demonstrates that the narratives describing Josephus’ Wicked Men, the Testimonium Flavianum, and the description of John the Baptist display a remarkable amount of parallelism. They have a common narrative sequence and within the narrative there are many shared parallel elements, such as vocabulary or subtopics.

The “Wicked Men” narratives in Antiquities of the Jews tend to be longer and more prolix than the narratives in War of the Jews; cells containing text from Antiquities of the Jews often contain more words, than the corresponding cells from Jewish War. The narratives in Josephus’ Vita seem less detailed and have a less complex structure than the narratives in the other two books. This is consistent with H. St. J. Thackeray’s contention that portions of Josephus’ works were actually written by a pair of Greek speaking assistants. A “superb Greek stylist” contributed to Jewish War, while a longwinded “Thucydian Hack” wrote large portions of the last three or four chapters of Antiquities of the Jews. Josephus Vita, according to Thackeray, was written by Josephus himself with minimal outside assistance, and the shorter simpler format of its narratives is consistent with having been written by an Aramaic speaker who learned Greek as a second language[6].

The “Wicked Men” narrative formulation was devised by the “Greek stylist”, Josephus’ first assistant. Presumably he developed and used the formula throughout the second half of Jewish War, in order to simplify his task of having to repeatedly summarize the activities of each of the many Judean troublemakers who arose during the time period leading up to the Jewish revolt. Rather than compose an original and independent passage for each of the troublemakers the “Greek stylist” simply changed a few details of his narrative formula in order to create another seemingly independent “Wicked Man” narrative.

Much of the latter half of Antiquities of the Jews presented material that had already appeared in Jewish War. The “Thucydian Hack” expanded upon the narrative formula devised by his predecessor, but retained its narrative outline when he made his contributions to the final chapters of Antiquities of the Jews. Josephus also attempted to imitate the writing techniques of his Greek assistants when he wrote the passages describing various troublemakers in his Vita.

The structure of the Testimonium Flavianum[4] and the John the Baptist episode[5] bear a superficial resemblance to the structure of the Wicked Man narratives. However, unlike the Wicked Man narratives, neither the Testimonium Flavianum nor the John the Baptist episode displays any hostility toward their subject. The Testimonium Flavianum column contains empty cells, that is, it lacks narrative elements that are contained in most of the other Wicked Men narratives. The phrase “did not cease” (Greek:οὐκ ἐπαύσαντο) in the Testimonium Flavianum is the opposite of the “Wicked Men’s” disciples escaping /fleeing/or scattering when confronted by the authorities[7]. The Testimonium Flavianum also contains a pair of cells whose contents have no match with the other Wicked Men narrations.

The Testimonium Flavianum contains some but not all of the features of the “Wicked Man” narrative format that was employed throughout Jewish War and Antiquities of the Jews. Unlike the other exemplars of this narrative format, the Testimonium Flavianum speaks favorably of its subject. These two findings suggest that the Testimonium Flavianum was not written by the original author(s) of Antiquities of the Jews, but rather by a later interpolator who had not completely mastered the style of Josephus’ literary deputies.

Other commentators have noted that the Testimonium Flavianum interrupts the narrative flow of Book 18, contains non Josephian vocabulary, and that Josephus, having already declared Vespasian the messiah, would not have turned about and jeopardized his position within the Flavian household by stating that Jesus was the Christ [8]. These are additional indicators that the Testimonium Flavianum is an interpolation which was not part of the original document produced by Josephus and his Flavian ghost writers.

The John the Baptist column in the Table has more rows that correlate with other Wicked Man rows than does the Testimonium Flavianum. However, the cells of the John the Baptist column appear to have fewer parallel topic matches (indicated by colored text in each row of the Table) with the other text columns. As mentioned above, Josephus or rather his assistant, the Thucydian Hack, appears to have written favorably about John the Baptist, while the subjects of stylistically similar passages were disparaged. This is consistent with the John the Baptist passage in Antiquities of the Jews having been edited or censored. The text maintains its narrative structure, but displays fewer correlations at the cellular level with its cognate passages in Jewish War and Antiquities of the Jews. These anomalies suggest that Josephus’ original text about John the Baptist was altered, its narrative sequence was preserved, but its implication was changed. The passage about John the Baptist was probably transformed from a report about a politically active rabble-rouser to the present story about an irksome but otherwise harmless religious reformer[9].

In conclusion, the attached table shows the extensive parallelism between the passages in the works of Flavius Josephus that describe an assortment of revolutionaries, terrorists, charlatans and other wicked men. The table confirms the multiple authorship of the works attributed to Flavius Josephus. The Testimonium Flavianum is only a partial match to the passages describing wicked men which suggests that it is an interpolation that was not written at the same time as the other passages were. The passage about John the Baptist contains evidence that it underwent later editing or censorship. More information about the composition and transmission of Josephus manuscripts could be obtained using the same tabular comparison technique to study the original Greek texts of Josephus. This table could also be used as the basis for applying advanced analytical methods from cladistics and statistics in order to answer questions about composition and authorship of the works of Flavius Josephus.

David Blocker 2014 07

[1] Jewish War, Antiquities of the Jews and Life of Flavius Josephus

[2] Jewish War, Preface 4.11:

“…and that they were the tyrants among the Jews who brought the Roman power upon us, who unwillingly attacked us, and occasioned the burning of our holy temple…”

Antiquities of the Jews 20.8.5:

After an account describing the activities of impious robbers, Josephus wrote:

“And this seems to me to have been the reason why God, out of his hatred of these men’s wickedness, rejected our city; and as for the temple, he no longer esteemed it sufficiently pure for him to inhabit therein, but brought the Romans upon us, and threw a fire upon the city to purge it; and brought upon us, our wives, and children, slavery, as desirous to make us wiser by our calamities.”

[3] Josephus’ descriptions of strong troublemakers who had royal pretentions:

From Jewish War:

2 4 1 Judas, the son of that arch-brigand Hezekias

2 4 2 Simon, one of the royal servants

2 4 3 A shepherd called Athrongeus

2 8 1 A Galilean named Judas, (See Judas in Antiquities 18.1.1)

2 13 2 The arch-brigand Eleazar and many of his group

From Antiquities of the Jews:

17 10 4. “for many rose up to go to war”

17 10 5. A fellow called Judas, son of the Ezekias who had been leader of the brigands

17 10 6. A slave of king Herod called Simon

17 10 7 Athrongeus

17 10 8 (285) Judea was full of robberies, and as the various rebel groups chose anyone they found to head them, he immediately became king, to the public ruin. They harmed only a few of the Romans, and in small ways, but committing terrible murders among their own people.

18 1 1 JUDAS, A GAULONITE from a city called Gamala, with the support of the Pharisee Sadduc, … I will explain a little about this, since the infection of the younger impressionable elements by these ideas brought our affairs to ruin.

18 1 6 Judas the Galilean.

Josephus’ description of murderous terrorists:

From Jewish War:

2 13 3 “Another sort of brigands called Sicarii grew up in Jerusalem, who killed people in broad daylight even in the city itself. 255 This was mainly during the festivals, when they mingled among the people with daggers concealed under their clothing to stab their enemies, and when the victim fell, joined in the protest against it, to make them seem trustworthy, so they could not be found out. 256 The first to be killed by them was Jonathan the high priest, after whom many were killed daily, resulting in a terror that was worse than the event itself, and as everyone faced the prospect of death at any moment, the same as in wartime. 257 People had to be on guard and keep their distance, no longer daring to trust even friends who were approaching them, but despite all precautions and security, they were still killed, so quickly and cunningly did the conspirators come at them.”

From Antiquities of the Jews: 17 10 8

[4] Antiquities of the Jews 18 3 3

[5] Antiquities of the Jews 18 5 2 (114 et seq.)

[6] H. St. J. Thackeray, Josephus, Man and Historian; Lecture V.

[7] The canonical Gospels state that Jesus’ disciples deserted him and fled at the first sign of trouble (Mark 15:40 and parallels),and that Simon Peter, in particular, repudiated his leader (Matthew 26:33-35, Mark 14:29-31, Luke 22:33-34, John 13:36-38). This is the opposite of Josephus’ statement that Jesus was not abandoned by his followers.

[8]Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” in Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013)

Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), pp. 305–322

Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” in New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012

[9] In the Gospel of Mark*, Slavonic Josephus ** and Apocryphal John texts ***, John posed a threat to the legitimacy of Herod Antipas’ rule by implying that Herod’s impious marriage to his sister in law made him unfit to rule over his Jewish subjects.

* Mark 6:14-20

**( (9)John the Forerunner, p. 644 and (11) The Wild Man (John) p. 646, from the Slavonic Additions in Josephus III, the Jewish Was, Books IV-VII, with an English translation by H. St. John Thackeray, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1928, reprinted 1968 )

***The Life of John the Baptist by Serapion from A. Mingana, Woodbrooke Studies: Christian Documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, vol. 1, Cambridge 1927, pp. 138-287 and The Beheading of John by Euriptus, the disciple of John, translated by Tony Burke from A. Vassiliev, Anecdota graeco-byzantina, I, Moscow, 1893, pp. 1-4, based on Montis Casin. 277 (11th c.) recovered from http://www.tonyburke.ca/more-christian-apocrypha/the-beheading-of-john-by-euriptus-the-disciple-of-john/ on July 18, 2014. This page archived at https://web.archive.org/web/20100915000000*/http://www.tonyburke.ca/more-christian-apocrypha/the-beheading-of-john-by-euriptus-the-disciple-of-john/.

Testimonium Flavianum, del 2

Då följer del 2 av min Wikipediaartikel om Testimonium Flavianum.  Denna del återger i huvudsak argument till stöd för att hela stycket är en kristen förfalskning, en ståndpunkt som jag alltså delar.

Del 1 av artikeln finns att läsa här: Testimonium Flavianum, del 1

Testimonium Flavianum (del 2)

Innehåll

- – – – – – – – – – – – -

- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – -

Argument till stöd för förfalskning i sin helhet

Att Josefus inte skrivit något alls av Testimonium Flavianum

1) Språket

Testimonium Flavianum innehåller flera uttryck som anses främmande för Josefus. Exempelvis använder Josefus aldrig grekiskans poiêtês i betydelsen av någon som ”utför”, en ”skapare”, utan enbart i betydelsen poet,[136] vilket innebär att uttrycket paradoxôn ergôn poiêtês, alltså ”utförde underbara verk”, inte är typiskt för honom.[137] Vidare finns uttrycket ”de kristnas [folk]stam” avseende samfundet av kristna. Ingen enda gång använder Josefus uttrycket ”stam” (grekiska: fylon) för att beteckna en religiös gemenskap, som ju kristna utgjorde. Slutligen förekommer uttrycket eis eti te nun, ”intill nuvarande tidpunkt”, ingen annanstans hos Josefus förutom i Testimonium Flavianum, medan Eusebios använde det vid sex tillfällen.[138]

Emot detta invänder Whealey att texten kan ha blivit korrupt i samband med att nya handskrifter ersatte de gamla. Exempelvis lyder texten i de två äldsta handskrifterna av Judiska fornminneneis te nun” i stället för eis eti te nun, och den läsarten förekommer också på andra ställen. Eftersom Josefus använder uttrycket eis te nun talar detta enligt Whealey för att han skrivit nämnda parti i Testimonium Flavianum.[139] Vidare kan vissa ord och uttryck förvisso förekomma i en annan form eller så endast en gång i en författares hela verk utan att det därmed är misstänkt. Meier menar att det kan vara en ren tillfällighet att Josefus inte använt poiêtês i betydelsen av att göra något eftersom han använder närbesläktade former av ordet i den betydelsen.[140]

2) Identifieringen av Jesus som Messias

Jesus identifieras som Messias vid ett tillfälle direkt och vid ytterligare två tillfällen indirekt, genom att texten antyder att han egentligen var Gud och att profeterna förutsagt hans ankomst. Åtminstone det senare identifierar Jesus som Messias. Det faktum att ordet Messias alls förekommer, oavsett om man tror att Josefus utnämnt Jesus till Messias eller bara redogjort för att andra ansåg honom vara Messias, talar emot att Josefus skrivit Testimonium Flavianum. Josefus beskriver åtminstone femton möjliga Messiasgestalter (Testimonium Flavianum borträknat) där fem relativt säkert såg sig själva som Messias eller av folket betraktades som Messias.[141] Men Josefus uttrycker bara förakt för dessa fem Messiasgestalter[142] och undviker att använda ordet Messias om någon av dem.[143] Ordet Messias (grekiska: Χριστὸς, Christos) förekommer hos Josefus vid endast de två tillfällen då Jesus omnämns, vilket talar för att båda dessa passager är senare tillägg.

Man kan misstänka att Josefus medvetet undvek ordet Messias då detta var så starkt förknippat med den judiska önskan om militär befrielse från den romerska ockupationen och därmed avskytt också av den romerska maktsfären. Josefus utser faktiskt kejsar Vespasianus till Messias.[144] Han hävdar att judarna misstolkat den messianska profetian i 4 Mos 24:17–19 – att den som där sägs ska ”bli härskare över den bebodda världen” är Vespasianus. Trots detta indirekta utpekande av kejsar Vespasianus till Messias använder Josefus inte ordet Messias om Vespasianus.[145] Josefus verkar alltså ha skytt ordet Messias och kan av den anledningen inte gärna ha använt det i beskrivningen av Jesus och därmed inte heller ha skrivit Testimonium Flavianum i den form stycket föreligger, speciellt när han redan utsett Vespasianus till Messias/Kristus.

Mot detta går att invända att de passager i Testimonium Flavianum där Jesus utnämns till Messias kan vara senare tillägg. Ett annat argument går ut på att Josefus inte behöver ha sett negativt på Jesus. Whealey hävdar exempelvis att det är anakronistiskt att anta att Josefus som jude måste ha sett negativt på Jesus bara för att förhållandet mellan judar och kristna på 100-talet och senare var fientligt. Hon menar att så inte behöver ha varit fallet på Josefus tid och att Josefus därför kan ha skrivit de flesta av de positiva omdömen om honom som förekommer i Testimonium Flavianum.[146]

3) Josefus nämner inte Jesus i sitt äldre historieverk

Josefus nämner inget om Jesus i sitt äldre historieverk Om det judiska kriget (klart tidigast 78 vt). När han där på ett motsvarande sätt skriver om Pontius Pilatus och behandlar samma händelser saknas bland annat Testimonium Flavianum.[147] Om Josefus, såsom Whealey föreslår, såg positivt på Jesus och betraktade honom som en betydelsefull gestalt, varför skrev Josefus då inte om Jesus också i sitt första verk?[148][149]

Mot detta kan invändas att heller inte passagerna om Johannes döparen och Jakob förekommer i Om det judiska kriget. Vidare skulle kristendomen ha kunnat öka i betydelse i tiden mellan böckernas tillkomst och alltså först på 90-talet ha kvalificerat sig för att omnämnas.[150] En annan möjlighet är att Josefus använt andra källor för Judiska fornminnen och att Jesus omnämnts i dessa källor. För böckerna 18–20 förefaller de nya källorna dock i huvudsak ha varit romerska och inte ha sitt ursprung i det område Jesus ska ha verkat i. En ytterligare annan möjlighet är att Josefus hade ett annat motiv med sin senare bok – att han då i högre grad vände sig till icke-judar och därför fokuserade mer på populära rörelser och folk som förtryckts av det judiska ledarskapet.[151]

4) Testimonium Flavianum är orimligt kort

Om Josefus likväl ansett att Jesus var av betydelse och borde omtalas, varför skrev han då så relativt litet om honom?[152] Stycket om Johannes döparen[153] är exempelvis mer än dubbelt så långt och stycket som följer på Testimonium Flavianum och som handlar om Isiskulten och judendomen[154] och som dessutom är rätt trivialt är åtta gånger så långt. Stycket är av den längden att det skulle kunna infogas i en befintlig text utan att äventyra att den blev så lång att den inte fick plats i en bokrulle.[155] Det argument som brukar åberopas emot detta är att kristendomen ännu inte hunnit växa sig så stor när Josefus skrev att han ansåg sig föranledd att skriva mer.[156]

5) Testimonium Flavianum passar ej i sitt sammanhang

Styckena före och efter Testimonium Flavianum handlar alla om olyckor som drabbat judarna. Frånsett berättelsen om Jesus beskrivs alla händelser som olyckor, tumult och upplopp genom det grekiska ordet thoruboi, förutom vid ett tillfälle då ordet stasis med likartad betydelse används.[157][158] ´Som det ser ut förstör därför Jesuspassagen Josefus avsikt med denna avdelning som i övrigt visar på hur spänningen tilltar för judar runt om i riket.[159][160] En avrättning av en enskild person, tillika ledaren för den kristna sekten, skulle inte ha uppfattats som en olycka för judarna, framför allt inte av Josefus som var en jude väl förankrad i den judiska traditionen[161][162] och som identifierar sig som farisé.[163]

Mot detta kan invändas att fotnoten inte var uppfunnen vid denna tid och man tvingades därför göra plats för utvikningar inne i texten.[164][165] Fast när Josefus gjorde sådana utvikningar brukade han, i likhet med hur han gjorde i stycket efter Testimonium Flavianum, tala om att han gjorde en utvikning.[166] Vidare handlar omgivande berättelser om Pilatus tid vid makten[167] och Testimonium Flavianum befinner sig följaktligen både tidsmässigt och geografiskt på rätt ställe i texten.[168]

6) Meningen efter Testimonium Flavianum syftar på stycket före

Nästföljande stycke efter Testimonium Flavianum inleds med orden: ”Och ungefär vid denna tid var det ytterligare något förskräckligt som upprörde judarna”. Eftersom ”ytterligare något förskräckligt” (heteron ti deinon) måste syfta på något förskräckligt som Josefus just beskrivit och eftersom Jesu avrättning inte gärna kan ha varit något förskräckligt som upprörde judarna i allmänhet,[169] synes uttrycket syfta på stycket före Testimonium Flavianum där Pilatus sades ha genomfört en masslakt på judar.[170] Det var något förskräckligt som borde ha upprört judarna, och det verkar därför som om Josefus när han skrev att det vid denna tid var ytterligare något förskräckligt som upprörde judarna just hade avslutat beskrivningen av Pilatus massdödande av judar och att Testimonium Flavianum ännu inte förekom i texten.[171]

Mot detta brukar tre invändningar göras. (1) Att Josefus med ”ytterligare något förskräckligt” åsyftade allt annat förskräckligt som drabbat judarna och som han skrivit om tidigare, före Testimonium Flavianum,[172][173] (2) att Josefus verkligen skulle ha ansett att Jesu korsfästning var något förskräckligt som drabbat judarna,[174] eller (3) att Testimonium Flavianum i Josefus ursprungsversion innehöll en väsentligt annorlunda berättelse som verkligen beskrev något förskräckligt också för judarna, exempelvis ett upplopp som Pilatus slog ner.[175][176]

7) Testimonium Flavianum okänt fram till 300-talet

Ingen kyrkofader före Eusebios (100- och 200-talen, eller ens 300-talet) citerar eller hänvisar till Testimonium Flavianum. Vi känner till 14 kyrkofäder, däribland Origenes, vilka alla var verksamma före Eusebios tid (början av 300-talet) och sannolikt alla var bekanta med Josefus skrifter. Flera av dessa kyrkofäder citerade passager från Josefus, dock utan att hänvisa till Testimonium Flavianum.[177] Redan från tidig kristen tid var kristna upptagna med att försvara den kristna tron mot angrepp från meningsmotståndare, inte minst judar, och en hänvisning till en judisk källa som hyllade Jesus borde ha varit av intresse för dem alla. Louis Feldman pekar särskilt på Justinus Martyren som i mitten av 100-talet försöker bemöta påståendena att Jesus aldrig funnits och blott var ett kristet fantasifoster.[178] Enligt Feldman kunde det inte finnas något starkare argument för att bemöta sådana påståenden än att citera Josefus; en jude som föddes bara några år efter att Jesus dött.[179]

Invändningen mot tystnadsargumentet är att det är riskabelt att argumentera utifrån avsaknad av bevittnanden. Feldman håller med om den saken, men påpekar att när tystnaden är så massiv som i detta fall har argumentet ändå viss tyngd.[180] Vidare finns tecken på att kristna i allmänhet kände dåligt till Josefus och i synnerhet den andra halvan av hans Judiska fornminnen.[181] Det verkar dock osannolikt att om Josefus verkligen skrivit om Jesus, kunskapen om detta inte skulle ha spridit sig bland kristna. Andra argumenterar för att om de mest uppenbart kristna partierna tas bort kommer den återstående texten inte att stödja att Jesus var Guds son som uppstod från de döda. En sådan text skulle enligt detta synsätt endast visa att Jesus existerat, och i så fall skulle det inte ha funnits någon anledning för kyrkofäderna att åberopa stycket.[182] Detta motsägs dock av Feldman i resonemanget ovan. Därför spekulerar andra över att Josefus verk kan ha innehållit en annan och för kristna mindre fördelaktig version av Testimonium Flavianum[183] och att de av den anledningen inte fann något skäl till att hänvisa till passagen. Något egentligt textstöd för ett sådant antagande finns dock inte.[184]

8) En handskrift där Testimonium Flavianum saknades

Två patriarker i Konstantinopel förefaller ha haft en avskrift av Judiska fornminnen (möjligen samma avskrift) där Testimonium Flavianum inte ingick. Ca år 400 citerar Johannes Chrysostomos fyra gånger ur den bok av Josefus där Testimonium Flavianum förekommer utan att nämna stycket.[185] I stället skriver han att Josefus inte var en troende kristen.[186] I slutet av 800-talet sammanfattar Fotios i Bibliotheke (svenska: Boksamling) ett stort antal verk skrivna av andra, däribland Josefus författarskap,[187] men undgår att nämna Testimonium Flavianum trots att han återger passagerna om Jakob och Johannes döparen[188] och i övrigt verkar leta efter vad man skrivit om Jesus.[189]

Den vanliga invändningen mot detta är att om deras Josefustext i stället innehöll en version av Testimonium Flavianum som var mer neutral eller rentav fientlig mot Jesus skulle de av den anledningen ha avstått från att nämna passagen. Louis Feldman skriver däremot att det knappast finns någon kyrkofader som hetsar mer mot judarna än just Chrysostomos. Feldman anser därför att denne nästan oavsett hur Testimonium Flavianum sett ut borde ha haft svårt att undvika att hänvisa till passagen. Hade Josefus varit negativ till Jesus kunde Chrysostomos ha påtalat att detta var ett typiskt agerande från en jude. Hade Josefus varit positivt inställd till Jesus kunde Chrysostomos med hänvisning till Testimonium Flavianum ha påvisat att judarna var skyldiga till hans död.[190]

9) En innehållsförteckning utan Testimonium Flavianum

Nästan samtliga grekiska och latinska handskrifter av Judiska fornminnen inleds med en något skissartad lista över bokens innehåll.[191] Denna innehållsförteckning innehåller inte Testimonium Flavianum. Om innehållsförteckningen är gjord under den tid då kristendomen var i maktposition (början av 300-talet och framåt), är detta ett osvikligt tecken på att Testimonium Flavianum då saknades eftersom ett sådant stycke otvivelaktigt skulle ha omnämnts.[192]

Mot detta kan invändas att innehållsförteckningen kan vara äldre och till och med möjligen ha iordningställts av Josefus själv.[193] Och en jude i den äldsta tiden behöver inte ha gett Testimonium Flavianum någon speciell uppmärksamhet genom att omnämna det i sammanfattningen av bokens innehåll. Dessutom saknas mycket annat i innehållsförteckningen, även styckena om Jakob och Johannes Döparen.[194]

10) Testimonium Flavianum är en enhet och allt eller inget måste behållas

De klart kristna partierna som rimligen måste plockas bort för att trovärdiggöra att Josefus kan ha skrivit Testimonium Flavianum är logiskt länkade till de delar som blir kvar. Om exempelvis indikationen på att Jesus var Gud, ”om det nu är tillbörligt att kalla honom en man”, tas bort blir nästa mening, ”för han var en som gjorde förunderliga gärningar” märklig. Detta ”för” tycks vara en reaktion på ifrågasättandet att Jesus var en människa. Alltså, man kan verkligen fråga sig om Jesus var en människa för/eftersom han gjorde förunderliga gärningar. Om texten i stället löd att Jesus var en vis man för/eftersom han gjorde förunderliga gärningar blir den besynnerlig. I så fall borde författaren ha skrivit att Jesus var en vis man och gjorde förunderliga gärningar.[195] På samma sätt blir den påstått äkta meningen om ”de kristnas stam, uppkallad efter honom” ologisk om ”han var Kristus” plockas bort, ty endast genom informationen att Jesus kallas Kristus blir uppgiften om att kristna fått sitt namn av Kristus logisk. Av denna anledning behövs även de delar i Testimonium Flavianum som är tydligt kristna om man vill behålla en logiskt sammanhållen text. Och eftersom vissa partier i Testimonium Flavianum inte gärna kan ha skrivits av Josefus blir den logiska slutsatsen att han inte skrivit något alls av stycket.

Motargumenten till detta är att återstoden visst utgör en logiskt sammanhållen enhet,[196] eller att Josefus verkligen skrivit hela Testimonium Flavianum och därmed också de tydligt kristna delarna. De som argumenterar för den senare positionen anser att texten ska tolkas som mindre kristen än vad som normalt görs och kanske till och med fientlig mot kristendomen (i några fall till följd av att vissa ord antas ha blivit korrupta i transkriberingen), eller som om texten är avsiktligt dubbeltydig och kanske till och med ironiskt menad.[197][198][199] Carleton Paget påpekar dock att om man försöker omtolka de besvärliga passagerna för att bevara en logiskt sammanhållen text, blir till slut den kvarvarande texten mer eller mindre densamma som den bevarade versionen av Testimonium Flavianum och liknar därmed en ”fullständig interpolation”. I så fall skulle man enligt Paget kunna göra detsamma med andra trostexter i Nya testamentet, och bara skala bort allt som låter kristet i syfte att nå fram till en neutral text om Jesus.[200] Paget är tveksam till om detta är en metodologiskt säker metod och ifrågasätter Meiers och andras påstående att man utifrån språkliga överväganden kan avgöra vad som är ursprungligt och inte.[201]

11) Eusebios skapade Testimonium Flavianum

Ken Olson, i likhet med Solomon Zeitlin före honom,[202] argumenterar för att Eusebios skapade hela Testimonium Flavianum i början av 300-talet och att hans skapelse senare infogades i bok 18 av Josefus Judiska fornminnen. Till stöd för sitt antagande anför Olson språket i Testimonium Flavianum som enligt honom stämmer mycket bättre med Eusebios språkbruk än det gör med Josefus’. Utöver att Josefus aldrig använder vissa uttryck i Testimonium Flavianum som Eusebios använder, exempelvis ”och tiotusen andra ting”, ”de kristnas stam”, ”och ända till nu”, 8, 2 respektive 6 gånger var, drar Eusebios enligt Olson likartade slutsatser som de som förekommer i Testimonium Flavianum och resonerar i enlighet med de föreställningar som där kommer till uttryck. Olson anser att Testimonium Flavianum stämmer mycket väl överens med Eusebios språkbruk och med hans sätt att resonera.[203][204] Dessutom använder han Testimonium Flavianum för att bemöta påståenden att Jesus inte utförde några äkta underverk utan blott var en trollkarl och bedragare,[205] samma uppgift som Origenes bemötte hos Kelsos utan att hänvisa till Testimonium Flavianum.[206]

Olsons teori har kritiserats av James Carleton Paget, som bland annat menar att Eusebios i sin polemik inte använder de delar av Testimonium Flavianum som Olson bygger på,[207] och av Alice Whealey.[208] Whealey anser att Olsons paralleller till Eusebios inte alltid är exakta och när de är exakta avfärdar hon dem genom att exempelvis föreslå att ordet poiêtês, som i Josefus hela verk endast i Testimonium Flavianum förekommer i betydelsen av att utföra något, har haft en sådan påverkan på Eusebios att han efter att ha läst Testimonium Flavianum själv började använda ordet i den betydelsen, men då bara om Jesus och om Gud.[209] Olson menar dock att om man skulle anta att Eusebios har influerats så mycket av Testimonium Flavianum att han härmat dess språk (och dess kristologi), har man nästintill gjort det omöjligt att falsifiera äkthetshypotesen.[210]

Louis Feldman stöder Olsons resonemang och noterar att i den bevarade antika grekiska litteraturen förekommer uttrycken ”gjorde förunderliga gärningar” (paradoxôn ergôn poiêtês),[211] ”ända till nu” (eis eti te nun)[212] och ”de kristnas stam” (tôn christianôn … fylon)[213] endast hos Eusebios och i Testimonium Flavianum. Uttrycken förekommer aldrig annars hos Josefus eller hos någon annan överhuvudtaget.[214] Dessa uttryck tillhör dessutom de så kallade ”äkta” delarna av Testimonium Flavianum, vilka Josefus antas ha skrivit. Feldman anser att det i hög grad måste ha stört Eusebios, som kristen apologet och obändig försvarare av Jesus och den kristna tron, att ingen historiker före honom åstadkommit ens en summarisk skildring av Jesu liv och att detta kan ha motiverat honom till att skapa Testimonium Flavianum.[215] Feldman hävdar också att det finns skäl anta att en kristen som Eusebios skulle ha försökt framställa Josefus som mer välvilligt inställd till Jesus och att han därför mycket väl kan ha förfalskat en sådan redogörelse som den i Testimonium Flavianum.[216]

Goldbergs parallell med Emmausberättelsen

I en artikel från 1995 påvisar Gary J. Goldberg tydliga likheter i ord, uttryck och struktur i Testimonium Flavianum och i Lukasevangeliets berättelse om den uppståndne Jesus möte med två lärjungar på vägen till Emmaus (Luk 24:13–35).[217] Denna omständighet har använts både för att argumentera för att Testimonium Flavianum är skrivet av Josefus (som Goldberg gör och som andra håller med om)[218][219] och att det är en kristen förfalskning baserad på Emmausberättelsen i Lukasevangeliet. Goldberg har jämfört Testimonium Flavianum med Lukas 24:19–27 (med undantag för tillbakablicken i verserna 22–24). Han finner då 20 ord eller kluster av ord som förekommer i den grekiska texten i båda passagerna och 19 av dessa förekommer dessutom i samma ordning (undantaget är ”han var Messias”). Det enda i Testimonium Flavianum som saknar motsvarighet i Lukas 24:19–27 är uttrycken ”om det nu är tillbörligt att kalla honom en man”, ”ty han visade sig” och ”ända till nu har de kristnas stam, uppkallad efter honom, inte dött ut”. Inom varje kluster kan dock orden komma i omvänd ordning. Goldberg ger tre realistiskt möjliga förslag på denna överensstämmelse mellan texterna: (1) slumpen, (2) en kristen förfalskning gjord under inflytande av Emmausberättelsen i Lukasevangeliet, eller (3) att författaren av Lukasevangeliet och Josefus använt en gemensam källa.[220]

Goldberg anser att överenstämmelsen är för stor för att kunna tillskrivas slumpen och föredrar alternativ 3, att Josefus och författaren av Lukasevangeliet byggt på en gemensam kristen källa. Detta innebär i så fall enligt Goldberg att Josefus valde att inte ändra något i denna kristna källa utöver att anpassa språket något. Till stöd för detta anför Goldberg bland annat att det finns tecken på att Emmausberättelsen i Lukasevangeliet bygger på en redan existerande tradition; att där finns samstämmighet i vissa ovanliga uttryck, som exempelvis tritên echôn hêmeran i Testimonium Flavianum som bokstavligt betyder ”tredje dag havande”, och där en liknande konstruktion (där verbet heller inte verkar ha något uppenbart subjekt)[221] endast förekommer en gång i den kristna litteraturen, och då just i Emmausberättelsen i Lukasevangeliet 24:21, tritên tautên hêmeran agei (”denna tredje dag tillbringar”);[222] att Agapius version i vissa avseenden liknar berättelsen i Lukasevangeliet, samt möjligheten att Josefus byggt på samma kristna källa också i sitt omnämnande av Jakob.[223] Därmed skulle Josefus och författaren av Lukasevangeliet ha byggt på en gemensam kristen text, och kristna endast lätt modifierat Josefus text i efterhand.[224]

Richard Carrier håller med om att de strukturella likheterna mellan passagerna är för stora för att man rimligen kan tillskriva dem slumpen. I motsats till Goldberg menar han dock att detta visar att en kristen person konstruerat hela Testimonium Flavianum med Lukasevangeliet som förlaga.[225] Han avfärdar möjligheten att Josefus skulle ha byggt på en kristen källa som också författaren av Lukasevangeliet använde, med motiveringen att det i sig är osannolikt att Josefus okritiskt skulle ha övertagit en kristen trosbekännelse utan att göra några större innehållsmässiga ändringar. Carrier avfärdar också Goldbergs förslag om att Josefus byggt på samma kristna källa för båda omnämnandena av Jesus[226] med motiveringen att det senare Jesusomnämnandet är en oavsiktlig interpolation i Josefus verk.[227][228] Vidare noterar Carrier att Testimonium Flavianum innehåller ord och uttryck som är kristna, vilket också Goldberg visar,[229] och till och med typiska för Lukas, vilket enligt Carrier egentligen bara lämnar ett återstående rimligt alternativ. Eftersom Josefus knappast kan ha slaviskt kopierat en kristen text blir slutsatsen enligt Carrier att Testimonium Flavianum är en kristen komposition gjord efter Josefus tid med Lukasevangeliet som förlaga.[230]

Referenser

Noter

  1. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament, (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 169–170.
  2. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 103; Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 80, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  3. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 110, n. 44.
  4. ^ Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 77, 101–105, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  5. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 81, n. 41.
  6. ^ Judas från Galileen, Theudas, egyptern, en icke namngiven profet och Menahem.
  7. ^ Jona Lendering. Overview of articles on ‘Messiah’.
  8. ^ John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus: the life of a Mediterranean Jewish peasant (San Francisco: Harper 1991), s. 199.
  9. ^ Andreas J. Köstenberger, L. Scott Kellum, Charles L. Quarles, The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown: An Introduction to the New Testament (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Academic, 2009), s. 105.
  10. ^ Josefus, Om det judiska kriget 6.312–313.
  11. ^ Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4, 2008, s. 575.
  12. ^ Giorgio Jossa, “Jews, Romans, and Christians: from the Bellum Judaicum to the Antiquitates”, s. 333; i Sievers & Lembi (eds.), Josephus and Jewish history in Flavian Rome and Beyond (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2005).
  13. ^ G. R. S. Mead, Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book, 1924, III The Slavonic Josephus’ Account of the Baptist and Jesus, s. 98.
  14. ^ Earl Doherty, Jesus: Neither God Nor Man – The Case for a Mythical Jesus (Ottawa: Age of Reason Publications, 2009), s. 548–549.
  15. ^ Robert Grant, A Historical Introduction to the New Testament (New York: Harper & Row, 1963).
  16. ^ Giorgio Jossa, “Jews, Romans, and Christians: from the Bellum Judaicum to the Antiquitates”, s. 331–342; i Sievers & Lembi (eds.), Josephus and Jewish history in Flavian Rome and Beyond (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2005).
  17. ^ Earl J. Doherty,. The Jesus Puzzle: Did Christianity Begin with a Mythical Christ? (Ottawa: Canadian Humanist Publications), 1999, s. 222.
  18. ^ Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:116–119.
  19. ^ Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:65–80.
  20. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 490.
  21. ^ E. P. Sanders, The Historical Figure of Jesus (New York: Penguin Press, 1993), s. 50–51.
  22. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 579.
  23. ^ Eduard Norden, ”Josephus und Tacitus über Jesus Christus und eine messianische Prophetie”, i Kleine Schriften zum klassischen Altertum (Berlin 1966), s. 245–250.
  24. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament, (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 164–165.
  25. ^ George A. Wells, The Jesus Legend (Chicago: Open Court, 1996), s. 50–51.
  26. ^ Marian Hillar, ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Vol. 13, Houston, TX., 2005, s. 66–103. Se ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus, s. 4.”.
  27. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament, (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 166–167.
  28. ^ Josefus, Liv 2.
  29. ^ Leo Wohleb hänvisar till Judiska fornminnen 8.26ff, 10:24ff och 13:171ff, passager som alla avbryter den pågående berättelsen. Leo Wohleb, ”Das Testimonium Flavianum. Ein kritischer Bericht über den Stand der Frage”, Römische Quartalschrift 35 (1927), s. 151–169.
  30. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 86.
  31. ^ Frank R. Zindler, The Jesus the Jews Never Knew: Sepher Toldoth Yeshu and the Quest of the Historical Jesus in Jewish Sources (New Jersey: American Atheist Press, 2003), s. 42–43.
  32. ^ Eduard Norden, ”Josephus und Tacitus über Jesus Christus und eine messianische Prophetie”, i Kleine Schriften zum klassischen Altertum (Berlin 1966), s. 241–275.
  33. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 225–226.
  34. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 165.
  35. ^ Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:60–62.
  36. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 489–490.
  37. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 86.
  38. ^ C. Martin, ”Le Testimonium Flavianum. Vers une solution definitive?”, Revue Beige de Philologie et d’Histoire 20 (1941), s. 422–431.
  39. ^ Gerd Theißen & ‎Annette Merz, The Historical Jesus: A Comprehensive Guide (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998), s. 72.
  40. ^ Robert Eisler, The Messiah Jesus and John the Baptist: According to Flavius Josephus’ recently rediscovered ‘Capture of Jerusalem’ and the other Jewish and Christian sources, 1931, s. 62.
  41. ^ David W. Chapman, Ancient Jewish and Christian Perceptions of Crucifixion; Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament; II ser. 244 (Tubingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2008), s. 80.
  42. ^ 1) Pseudo-Justinus, 2) Theofilos av Antiochia, 3) Melito av Sardes, 4) Minucius Felix, 5) Irenaeus, 6) Klemens av Alexandria, 7) Julius Africanus, 8) Tertullianus, 9) Hippolytos, 10) Origenes, 11) Methodios av Olympos, 12) Lactantius.(Michael Hardwick, Josephus as an Historical Source in Patristic Literature through Eusebios; Heinz Schreckenberg, Die Flavius-Josephus-Tradition in Antike und Mittelalter, 1972, s. 70ff). Till dessa kan också 13) Cyprianus av Karthago och 14) den grekisk-kristne apologeten Arnobius den äldre fogas. (Earl Doherty, Jesus: Neither God Nor Man – The Case for a Mythical Jesus, Ottawa: Age of Reason Publications, 2009, s. 538).
  43. ^ Justinus Martyren, Dialog med juden Tryfon 8.
  44. ^ Louis H. Feldman, ”Flavius Josephus Revisited: the Man, His writings, and His Significance”, 1972, s. 822 i Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt, 21:2 (1984).
  45. ^ Louis H. Feldman, ”Flavius Josephus Revisited: the Man, His writings, and His Significance”, 1972, s. 823–824 i Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt, 21:2 (1984).
  46. ^ Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 74–75, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  47. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 68, 79, 87.
  48. ^ Se Robert Eisler, The Messiah Jesus and John the Baptist: According to Flavius Josephus’ recently rediscovered ‘Capture of Jerusalem’ and the other Jewish and Christian sources, 1931, och s. 62 för Eislers hypotetiska rekonstruktion av Testimonium Flavianum i vilken Jesus framställs så negativt att Eisler kan tänka sig att Josefus också har skrivit passagen.
  49. ^ De enda texter som går att åberopa är de varianter som förekommer i Slaviska Josefus och dessa avfärdas numera nästa samfällt som medeltida förfalskningar. Se punkt 9 under argument för äkthet.
  50. ^ Louis H. Feldman, ”Flavius Josephus Revisited: the Man, His writings, and His Significance”, 1972, s. 822 i Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt, 21:2 (1984).
  51. ^ Johannes Chrysostomos, Predikan 76 om Matteus.
  52. ^ Fotios, Bibliotheke 47 (om Om det judiska kriget) och 76 & 238 (om Judiska fornminnen).
  53. ^ Fotios, Bibliotheke 238.
  54. ^ Exempelvis beklagar sig Fotios över att Justus av Tiberias i (det numera försvunna verket) Palestinsk historia “uppvisar judarnas vanliga fel” och inte ens nämner Kristus, hans liv och hans mirakler; Fotios, Bibliotheke 33.
  55. ^ Louis H. Feldman, ”Flavius Josephus Revisited: the Man, His writings, and His Significance”, 1972, s. 823 i Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt, 21:2 (1984).
  56. ^ Joseph Sievers, “The ancient lists of contents of Josephus’ Antiquities”, s. 271–292 i Studies in Josephus and the Varieties of Ancient Judaism”, eds. S. J. D. Cohen & J. J. Schwartz. Louis H. Feldman Jubilee Volume. Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity 67 (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2007).
  57. ^ Louis H. Feldman, ”Introduction”; i Louis H. Feldman, Gōhei Hata, Josephus, Judaism and Christianity (Detroit 1987), s. 350.
  58. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 556–557.
  59. ^ Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 19–20.
  60. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 102–108.
  61. ^ Detta är John P. Meiers huvudsakliga ståndpunkt i hans inflytelserika bok A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 56–88.
  62. ^ I detta avseende går kanske Vincent längst genom att omtolka i stort sett alla problematiska passager i Testimonium Flavianum så att de ska ses som ironiska och egentligen negativa. A. Vincent Cernuda, “El testimonio Flaviano. Alarde de solapada ironia”, ”Estudios Biblicos” 55 (1997), s. 355–385 & 479–508. Se James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 229–233.
  63. ^ Bland dem som på senare år argumenterat längs dessa banor märks Alice A. Whealey, Josephus on Jesus, The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Late Antiquity to Modern Times, Studies in Biblical Literature 36. (New York: Peter Lang, 2003); ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 73–116, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007) och Serge Bardet, Le Testimonium flavianum, Examen historique, considérations historiographiques, Josèphe et son temps 5; (Paris: Cerf, 2002), s. 79–85.
  64. ^ Sammanfattat av Ken Olson i ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 99.
  65. ^ Detta är precis vad Ken Olson demonstrerar med Apg 2:22–24 i ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 308–309.
  66. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 236–237.
  67. ^ Solomon Zeitlin, “The Christ Passage in Josephus”, The Jewish Quarterly Review, New Series, Volume XVIII, 1928, s. 231–255.
  68. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 97–114.
  69. ^ Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 305–322.
  70. ^ Eusebios, Demonstratio Evangelica 3:5:105f. Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 309.
  71. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 203.
  72. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 539–624.
  73. ^ Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 73–116, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  74. ^ Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 83, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  75. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 111.
  76. ^ Eusebios, Kyrkohistoria 1.2.23; Demonstratio Evangelica 114–115, 123, & 125.
  77. ^ Eusebios, Kyrkohistoria 1.11.8 (Testimonium Flavianum) & 2.1.7; Eclogae Propheticae, s. 168, rad 15.
  78. ^ Eusebios, Kyrkohistoria 3.3.2, 3.3.3.
  79. ^ “In total, then, three phrases—‘who wrought surprising feats,’ ‘tribe of the Christians,’ and ‘still to this day’—are found elsewhere in Eusebius and in no other author.” Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 26.
  80. ^ “… it must have greatly disturbed him that no one before him, among so many Christian writers, had formulated even a thumbnail sketch of the life and achievements of Jesus. Consequently, he may have been motivated to originate the Testimonium.” Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 27.
  81. ^ “In conclusion, there is reason to think that a Christian such as Eusebius would have sought to portray Josephus as more favorably disposed toward Jesus and may well have interpolated such a statement as that which is found in the Testimonium Flavianum.” Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 28.
  82. ^ Gary J. Goldberg, “The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus,” Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha 13 (1995), s. 59–77. Se ”The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus”.
  83. ^ Karl–Heinz Fleckenstein et al., Emmaus in Judäa, Geschichte-Exegese-Archäologie, (Brunnen Verlag, Gießen, 2003), s. 176.
  84. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 593–594.
  85. ^ Gary J. Goldberg, “The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus,” Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha 13 (1995), s. 59–77. Se ”The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus.”.
  86. ^ Se också James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 237.
  87. ^ Whealey hävdar att det är vanligt i kristna texter att Jesus sägs ha uppstått efter tre dagar i stället för på den tredje dagen, och att exempelvis de flesta handskrifter av Mark 8:31 har den läsarten; Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4 (2008), s. 579, n. 21.
  88. ^ Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:63–64.
  89. ^ Gary J. Goldberg, “The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus,” Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha 13 (1995), s. 59–77. Se ”The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus.”.
  90. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, i Hitler Homer Bible Christ: The Historical Papers of Richard Carrier 1995-2013 (Philosophy Press: Richmond, California, 2014), s. 344.
  91. ^ Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:63–64; 20:200.
  92. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 489–514.
  93. ^ Richard Carrier. ”Is This Not the Carpenter?”.
  94. ^ Gary J. Goldberg, “The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus,” Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha 13 (1995), s. 59–77. Se ”The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus, s. 1–2”.
  95. ^ Richard Carrier. ”Jesus in Josephus”.

Testimonium Flavianum, del 1

Jag har skrivit en ny Wikipedia-artikel. Efter att tidigare ha skrivit artiklarna om Hemliga Markusevangeliet och Morton Smith i sin helhet, har jag nu till och från under några veckors tid skrivit en helt ny artikel om Testimonium Flavianum.

På grund av artikelns längd väljer jag att dela upp den i två inlägg. Jag förmodar också att jag inte bryter mot några copyrightsregler emedan ingen annan skrivit något av artikeln (än så länge, kan tilläggas). Wikipediaartiklarna är som känt under ständig utveckling och kan när som helst ändras av vem som helst.

En artikel i ett uppslagsverk ska vara balanserad och neutral, samt spegla olika föreställningar på ett rättvist sätt. Eftersom jag anser att Testimonium Flavianum är en kristen förfalskning och att Josefus inte skrivit något alls av det som nu förekommer i textstycket, har det varit en stor utmaning för mig att redovisa även argumenten för äkthet på ett rättvist sätt. Det är inte alldeles lätt att framställa argument övertygande om man själv anser dessa argument vara ihåliga. Så jag får överlåta till andra att avgöra om jag lyckats vara balanserad. Här följer del 1 som huvudsakligen argumenterar för äkthet.

Del 2 av artikeln finns att läsa här: Testimonium Flavianum, del 2

 

Testimonium Flavianum (del 1)

Testimonium Flavianum är benämningen på en passage i den judiske historikern Flavius Josefus verk Judiska fornminnen och är latin för Josefus “Flavius vittnesbörd” om Jesus Kristus. I texten sägs Jesus ha varit en vis man som gjorde förunderliga gärningar och som korsfästes av Pontius Pilatus, men också ha varit förmer än en människa, ha varit Messias och ha uppstått på den tredje dagen från de döda just som profeterna förutsagt.

Efter att kristna i mer än ett årtusende betraktat Testimonium Flavianum som ett positivt judiskt vittnesbörd om Jesus, kom med tiden styckets äkthet att ifrågasättas. På 1600-talet tog den vetenskapliga undersökningen av texten sin början och allt sedan dess har frågan om styckets äkthet varit föremål för intensiv debatt bland forskare och denna debatt fortsätter än i dag.[1] Även om några få forskare vidhåller att Josefus skrivit Testimonium Flavianum i sin helhet[2] anser den överväldigande majoriteten att Josefus inte gärna kan ha skrivit alltsammans.[3] Merparten av denna majoritet antar att Josefus ändå skrivit något ursprungligt om Jesus som senare utökats med kristna tillägg,[4] medan en minoritet anser att hela Testimonium Flavianum är en kristen skapelse[5] som infogats i Judiska fornminnen efter Josefus tid.[6][7][8][9][10] De som antar att Josefus skrivit åtminstone en kärna av Testimonium Flavianum anser ofta att det utgör det viktigaste utombibliska vittnesbördet om Jesus.[11]

Innehåll

- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – -

Texten i översättning

 

Ungefär vid denna tid uppträdde Jesus, en vis man, om det nu är tillbörligt att kalla honom en man. För han var en som gjorde förunderliga gärningar, en lärare för människor som gärna tar emot sanningen, och han drog till sig många både judar och av grekiskt ursprung. Han var Messias. Och när Pilatus, på grund av en anklagelse från våra ledande män, dömde honom till korset, upphörde inte de som först hade älskat honom [att göra det]. Ty han visade sig för dem på den tredje dagen levande igen, [just som] de gudomliga profeterna hade förutsagt dessa och tiotusen andra underbara ting om honom. Och ända till nu har de kristnas stam, uppkallad efter honom, inte dött ut. (Flavius Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:63–64, i översättning av prof. Bengt Holmberg).[12]

 

Den grekiska originaltextenΓίνεται δὲ κατὰ τοῦτον τὸν χρόνον Ἰησοῦς σοφὸς ἀνήρ, εἴγε ἄνδρα αὐτὸν λέγειν χρή: ἦν γὰρ παραδόξων ἔργων ποιητής, διδάσκαλος ἀνθρώπων τῶν ἡδονῇ τἀληθῆ δεχομένων, καὶ πολλοὺς μὲν Ἰουδαίους, πολλοὺς δὲ καὶ τοῦ Ἑλληνικοῦ ἐπηγάγετο: ὁ χριστὸς οὗτος ἦν. [64] καὶ αὐτὸν ἐνδείξει τῶν πρώτων ἀνδρῶν παρ᾽ ἡμῖν σταυρῷ ἐπιτετιμηκότος Πιλάτου οὐκ ἐπαύσαντο οἱ τὸ πρῶτον ἀγαπήσαντες: ἐφάνη γὰρ αὐτοῖς τρίτην ἔχων ἡμέραν πάλιν ζῶν τῶν θείων προφητῶν ταῦτά τε καὶ ἄλλα μυρία περὶ αὐτοῦ θαυμάσια εἰρηκότων. εἰς ἔτι τε νῦν τῶν Χριστιανῶν ἀπὸ τοῦδε ὠνομασμένον οὐκ ἐπέλιπε τὸ φῦλον.[13]

Handskriftsläget

Ovanstående text förekommer i Josefus andra stora historieverk, Judiska fornminnen, som utkom på grekiska år 93 eller 94.[14] Den äldsta bevarade handskriften av detta verk där också bok 18 med Testimonium Flavianum förekommer är inte äldre än från tiohundratalet.[15] Testimonium Flavianum finns dock bevittnat genom att det citeras och omtalas långt tidigare och den förste att så göra är kyrkofader Eusebios av Caesarea i början av 300-talet.[16][17]

Kristna passager tillagda en äkta Josefustext

Testimonium Flavianums äkthet är omdebatterad. Eftersom passagen har en kristen prägel och eftersom Josefus inte i övrigt ger sken av att vara kristen,[18][19] anser nästan samtliga forskare som publicerat sig i ämnet att åtminstone delar av passagen är senare gjorda kristna tillägg. Exempelvis skulle Josefus inte gärna ha kunnat skriva att man kan ifrågasätta om Jesus var en man och därmed antyda att han i stället var Gud, att Jesus var Messias (ett påstående som en jude som Josefus näppeligen kunde göra eftersom det vore att bekänna sig till den kristna läran och ett påstående som dessutom skulle ha varit obegripligt för många icke-judar),[20] eller att de gudomliga profeterna hade förutsagt hans ankomst och uppståndelse (något som också vore att identifiera Jesus som Messias).[21] En hypotes som i modern tid vunnit anhängare är att Josefus skrev en ursprunglig text om Jesus och att denna senare utökades med kristna tillägg.[22] I citatet ovan är de oftast föreslagna tilläggen till denna tänkta ursprungliga Josefustext markerade i fetstil.[10] Eftersom språket på det stora hela är likvärdigt rakt igenom[23] brukar de delar som antas vara senare tillägg utmönstras utifrån i huvudsak iakttagelsen att de har ett alltför tydligt kristet innehåll. Exempelvis hävdar John P. Meier att det viktigaste skälet till att lyfta bort dessa delar är deras innehåll.[24] Den återstående texten antas enligt detta scenario ha skrivits av Josefus.

Det finns emellertid inget större textstöd för hypotesen om kristna tillägg till en autentisk Josefustext, eftersom alla återgivningar av Testimonium Flavianum i alla grekiska handskrifter av Josefus och Eusebios och i de bysantinska källorna med endast smärre stilistiska avvikelser innehåller den normativa texten i sin helhet.[25][26] Likaså återges stycket, med ett undantag, i sin helhet (frånsett smärre avvikelser)[27] i alla tidiga översättningar till andra språk.[28] Undantaget är den arabiska krönikan Kitâb al-‛unwân (Bok om titlar eller Bok om historien) skriven av den arabisk-kristne historikern Agapius år 942. Här återfinns Testimonium Flavianum i en kortare version med miraklen nedtonade och utan de mest uppenbart kristna partierna. Redan Shlomo Pines visade att Agapius och den syrisk-ortodoxe patriarken Mikael den store båda delar vissa distinkta avvikelser från den normativa versionen av Testimonium Flavianum i sina respektive återgivanden av passagen. Emedan Pines ansåg att Agapius sannolikt hade bevarat en version som låg närmare det Josefus skrivit,[29] har Alice Whealey på senare år visat att det är Mikaels text som är närmare den text som Agapius och Mikaels båda bygger på. Hon menar att de båda rimligen bygger på en gemensam syrisk text som även den hade dessa avvikelser.[30] Eftersom Mikael den store i Syrisk krönika från år 1173, med några få avvikelser, återger den fulla versionen av Testimonium Flavianum är det sannolikt Agapius själv som beskurit sin version. Deras gemensamma förlaga var en syrisk text som i sin tur var eller byggde på en översättning av Testimonium Flavianum gjord från Eusebios Kyrkohistoria och inte från Josefus Judiska fornminnen. Dessutom visar Ken Olson att Agapius hade för vana att tona ner just mirakelberättelser och att det därför är rimligt anta att han gjorde det också här.[31]

Han förmodades vara Messias

En av avvikelserna hos Mikael den store och Agapius från den normativa versionen är att Mikael skriver ”han ansågs vara Messias” och Agapius ”kanske är han Messias”.[32] Alice Whealey argumenterar för att den syriska förlagan därför hade ”han ansågs vara Messias”. Då denna förlaga antas vara gjord från Eusebios Kyrkohistoria och då dessutom den latinska översättning av Testimonium Flavianum som Hieronymus gjorde år 392 i De viris illustribus (Om berömda män),[33] också den sannolikt från Eusebios Kyrkohistoria,[34] har ”han förmodades vara Messias” (latin: credebatur esse Christus), föreslår Whealey att Testimonium Flavianum hos Eusebios och därmed också hos Josefus ursprungligen löd något i stil med ”han förmodades vara Messias”.[35] Hon bygger sin ståndpunkt på antagande att latinska och syriska författare normalt inte läste varandras verk och att därmed Hieronymus och den syriska författare som Agapius och Mikael båda byggde på båda sannolikt hade tillgång till en grekisk text med den läsarten.[36]

Vissa, som exempelvis Robert Eisler, föreslår dock att Hieronymus själv ändrade uttrycket ”var” till ”förmodades vara” för att ge stycket en prägel av sanning emedan Josefus inte gärna skulle ha kunnat skriva att Jesus var Messias.[37] Richard Carrier manar till att inte dra för långtgående slutsatser av vissa avvikelser, då sådana är frekventa såväl vid avskrifter som vid översättningar och att folk kan ha sina egna agendor för att ändra i texterna.[38] Marian Hillar föreslår att Hieronymus ändrade uttrycket som en förklaring till vilka det var som ansåg att Jesus var Messias. Hieronymus översättning av Testimonium Flavianum till latin är inte en ordagrann översättning och han dristar sig till att ändra vissa detaljer, exempelvis bygger han tillsynes på uppgiften i Matt 27:18 och skriver att det var på grund av de judiska ledarnas ”avund” (latin: cumque invidia = genom avund) som Jesus avrättades.[39] John P. Meier anser att ”han var Messias” stör berättelsens tankeflöde och att varje försök att spara uttrycket genom att ändra på det är oförnuftigt. Han menar att de varianter som förekommer hos exempelvis Hieronymus är senare utveckling av traditionen.[40] Det skulle också innebära en stor insats om alla texter, såväl grekiska som översatta skulle ha ändrats på just denna punkt,[41] inte minst eftersom ordalydelsen ”han var Messias” finns bevittnad mycket tidigt i latinska, syriska och armeniska översättningar, i vissa fall redan på 300-talet,[42] och eftersom det inte finns något textstöd för en mer neutral version i någon bevarad handskrift av Eusebios Kyrkohistoria.[43]

Nedan ges en sammanfattning av de oftast anförda argumenten till stöd för att Josefus skrivit åtminstone något av Testimonium Flavianum, och därefter de oftast anförda argumenten till stöd för att Josefus inte skrivit något alls av Testimonium Flavianum.

Argument till stöd för äkthet

Att Josefus skrivit hela eller delar av Testimonium Flavianum

1) Testimonium Flavianum förekommer i alla handskrifter

Genom att Testimonium Flavianum inte saknas i någon handskrift av Josefus Judiska fornminnen, vare sig på grekiska eller i översättning till annat språk,[44] finns inget textstöd för att passagen har lagts till i efterhand. Således finns inga bevis för att Testimonium Flavianum någonsin saknats i Judiska fornminnen.[45]

Mot detta kan invändas att den äldsta grekiska handskriften av den andra halvan av Judiska fornminnen (böckerna 11–20) där Testimonium Flavianum förekommer inte är äldre än från tiohundratalet. Eftersom passagen var känd av Eusebios på 300-talet (vare sig han verkligen citerade eller rentav skapade den) säger det faktum att den förekommer i handskrifter av Josefus som är 700 år yngre inte så mycket.[46][47] Vidare tillhör de endast tre bevarade handskrifterna samma handskriftslinje, liknar varandra och härrör alla från samma källa, det vill säga bevittnar läsarten i endast en äldre handskrift.[48][49] Om Testimonium Flavianum införts i förlagan till dessa äldsta handskrifter kommer också alla avskrifter att innehålla passagen.

Dessutom är det såvitt känt bara kristna som sett till att bevara Josefus handskrifter genom nya avskrifter.[50] Orsaken var säkert att Josefus historieverk skildrade händelser som också förekom i de bibliska texterna och därför var av större intresse för kristna.[51] Vidare finns tecken på att de flesta av de äldsta återgivningarna av passagen, vilka förekommer hos kyrkofäder och andra efter Eusebios tid, är hämtade från just Eusebios och inte från Josefus.[52] Slutligen finns tydliga indikationer på att det i Konstantinopel verkligen funnits en handskrift av Judiska fornminnen som saknade Testimonium Flavianum – en handskrift som både Johannes Chrysostomos (ca år 400) och Fotios (på 800-talet) använde (se punkt 8 i ”Argument till stöd för förfalskning i sin helhet”).

2) Språk och stil

Testimonium Flavianum är på det stora hela skrivet med ett språk som liknar Josefus’. Uttryck som ”vid denna tid”, ”vis man”, ”förunderliga gärningar”[53] och ”ledande män” anses alla vara typiska för Josefus.[54] Detta tyder i så fall på att Josefus själv skrivit passagen.[55] Framför allt “vis man” (sofos anēr), som Josefus använder för att beskriva Salomo och Daniel,[56] och ”förunderliga gärningar” (paradoxōn ergōn), som Josefus använder om profeten Elisha och kung Ptolemaios,[57] har framhållits som typiska uttryck för Josefus. Géza Vermès hävdar att det inte finns några vare sig stilistiska eller historiska argument som går att anföra mot äktheten i dessa två uttryck.[58] Detta har lett till antagandet att Josefus oberoende av evangelierna bevittnar att Jesus var en undergörande vis man och lärare som avrättades av Pilatus.[59]

Men även om ”förunderliga gärningar” (paradoxōn ergōn) är typiskt för Josefus använder han aldrig annars det fulla uttrycket ”gjorde förunderliga gärningar” (paradoxōn ergōn poiētēs).[60] Och även de delar i Testimonium Flavianum som till innehållet förefaller vara kristna skulle språkligt kunna vara skrivna av Josefus. Testimonium Flavianum låter sig inte så lätt delas upp i kristna och icke-kristna passager, vare sig på språklig eller på innehållsmässig grund.[61] Man kan därför också vända på argumentet och hävda att eftersom språket är enhetligt trots att vissa delar uppenbarligen är kristna, måste en eventuell förfalskare ha kunnat efterlikna Josefus. Denne förfalskare, speciellt om han var bekant med Josefus författarskap,[62] skulle då ha kunnat efterlikna honom också i resten av Testimonium Flavianum, något redan Charles Guignebert betraktade som en inte speciellt svår uppgift.[63] Till detta kan läggas att stycket är så relativt kort (och därmed också betydligt enklare att förfalska än annars vore fallet) att det är svårt att dra några säkra slutsatser om språket och stilen.[64]

3) Uttryck som en kristen förfalskare borde ha undvikit

Ett antal uttryck i Testimonium Flavianum, i huvudsak till antalet sex, anses innehålla ord, beskrivningar och formuleringar som man inte skulle förvänta sig att finna i en text skriven av en kristen person. Det gäller påståendet att Jesus var en ”vis man” (sofos anēr) som kan synas vara en alltför modest benämning på honom om det skrivits av en kristen. Att Jesus bara ”gjorde förunderliga [eller: underbara] gärningar” (paradoxōn ergōn poiētēs) verkar också vara ett relativt anspråkslöst påstående gjort av en kristen. Användandet av ordet hēdonē (glädje, njutning, lust) i beskrivningen av Jesus som en lärare för människor som ”gärna” tog emot sanningen (eller tog emot det sanna med ”lust”) vore inte typiskt för en kristen, då kristna som regel undvek hēdonē eftersom det också betyder hedonism, njutningslystnad. En kristen person borde heller inte ha skrivit att Jesus drog till sig många greker (dvs. icke-judar) eftersom det framgår av evangelierna att han inte gjorde det. Ett uttryck som “upphörde inte de som först hade älskat honom [att göra det]” är typiskt för Josefus och dessutom antyder det att kristendomens spridning skedde till följd av att anhängarna älskade Jesus och inte till följd av att han uppstod, vilket en kristen borde ha sagt. En kristen författare skulle inte gärna ha kallat de kristna för en (folk)stam (fylon).[65]

Ken Olson, som argumenterar för att Eusebios skapat hela Testimonium Flavianum, invänder mot argumentet att en kristen inte skulle ha uttryckt sig på detta sätt genom att visa att Eusebios använder alla dessa uttryck (något Josefus i flera av fallen inte gör). Eusebios skriver att Jesus (vår Frälsare och Herre) var en vis man (sofos anēr). Uttrycket ”gjorde förunderliga gärningar” (paradoxōn ergōn poiētēs) förekommer aldrig annars hos Josefus medan Eusebios använder det vid flera tillfällen. Eusebios använder ordet hēdonē tillsynes utan betänkligheter. Han skriver också att Jesus vände sig till greker.[66][67] Vidare anser Olson att det endast är genom att texten (som i den äldsta tiden skrevs utan både punkter och kommatecken) delas av på fel sätt som den kan tolkas så att spridning av kristendomen skett till följd av att anhängarna älskade Jesus. I stället säger texten enligt Olson att spridningen skett till följd av uppståndelsen (”upphörde inte de som först hade älskat honom [att göra det], ty han visade sig för dem på den tredje dagen levande igen”). Och i motsats till Josefus, som aldrig använder fylon (stam) i betydelsen av religiös gemenskap, talar Eusebios två gånger om ”den kristna stammen” (fylon)[68] och använder etniska termer som genos, laos och ethnos om kristna som om de vore ett folk.[69]

Vidare använder Josefus uttrycket ”vis man” tillsynes om dem han högaktar, som Salomo och Daniel,[70] och om man vill tro att Josefus skrivit detta måste man förutsätta att han såg på Jesus på ungefär samma sätt som han såg på dessa båda andra, vilket Josefus som jude och farisé inte borde ha gjort.[71]

4) En tidigare identifikation

Ett omnämnande av ”brodern till Jesus som kallades Kristus, vars namn var Jakob” i bok 20 av Judiska fornminnen förutsätter att Josefus redan tidigare identifierat vem den Jesus som kallades Kristus var, således en identifiering som ska ha gjorts i Testimonium Flavianum i bok 18.[72][73] Detta ses ofta som det starkaste argumentet för att Josefus skrivit något av Testimonium Flavianum.[74] De allra flesta forskare anser att denna text skrivits av Josefus och detta huvudsakligen utifrån antagandena att Josefus redan nämnt Jesus i Testimonium Flavianum, att texten är karakteristisk för Josefus och saknar direkt kristet innehåll och att kyrkofader Origenes bevittnar passagen.[75][76]

Mot detta görs invändningen att om hela Testimonium Flavianum i bok 18 är ett senare tillägg tyder denna omständighet i stället på att också Jakobpassagen i bok 20 är ett senare tillägg till Josefus text.[77][78] I så fall rörde det sig sannolikt om en oavsiktlig interpolation genom att en randanmärkning i marginalen på handskriften[79] med ordalydelsen ”brodern till Jesus som kallades Kristus” eller bara ”som kallades Kristus” uppfattades som om den tillhörde den löpande texten och därför infogades i denna vid nästa avskrift.[80]

Dessutom är en förutsättning för att Jesus ska identifieras som Kristus att också uttrycket ”Han var Kristus” förekom i Testimonium Flavianum och detta är ett av de stycken som brukar utmönstras som ett kristet tillägg.[81] Inte ens den hypotetiska varianten ”han förmodades vara Messias” kan sägas vara en tillräcklig identifikationsmarkör i Testimonium Flavianum för att försvara användandet av den senare identifikationen av Jesus som den ”som kallades Kristus”, eftersom det inte sägs att han ”kallades” Kristus i uttrycket ”han förmodades vara Kristus”. Josefus borde därför, i likhet med hur han nästan alltid gjorde annars, ha skrivit att han avsåg den Kristus som han berättat om tidigare i bok 18.[82]

5) Origenes kännedom om Testimonium Flavianum på 240-talet

Kyrkofader Origenes skriver på 240-talet att Josefus ”inte erkände Jesus som Kristus/Messias”.[83] Fastän Origenes inte nämner Testimonium Flavianum tolkar vissa detta yttrande som att han avser den passagen,[84] fast då en annan version, där ”han var Messias/Kristus” helt saknades, alternativt att det i stället stod ”han förmodades vara Messias”[85] eller kanske till och med ”han var inte Messias/Kristus”.[86][87]

Mot detta kan sägas att Origenes likväl borde ha omnämnt Testimonium Flavianum eftersom han knappast kunde ha avstått om han känt till passagen, inte minst i det verk där han bemötte kristendomskritikern Kelsos och försöker visa att Jesus var Messias och bland annat bemöta Kelsos påstående att Jesus mirakler visade att han var en magiker.[88][89] Detta hade Origenes kunnat bemöta bara genom att påvisa att Jesus var en vis man och alls ingen charlatan.[90] Han hänvisar dessutom till Josefus omnämnande av Johannes döparen[91] som förekommer i samma bok (bok 18)[92] vari också Testimonium Flavianum numera förekommer. Origenes tystnad tolkas således också så att Testimonium Flavianum ännu på Origenes tid saknades i Judiska fornminnen.[93]

Vidare påstod sig Origenes känna till ett stycke hos Josefus där denne skulle ha skrivit att Jerusalems fall och templets förstörelse var det straff judarna ådrog sig för att ha dödat ”Jakob, brodern till Jesus som kallades Kristus”.[94] Uttrycket ton adelfon Iêsou tou legomenou Christou (brodern till Jesus som kallades Kristus) är ordagrant detsamma som det som står i Judiska fornminnen 20:200, där översteprästen Ananos sägs ha avrättat av en viss Jakob.[95] Josefus nämner emellertid inget där om att Jakobs död skulle ha varit orsaken till att Jerusalem ödelades såsom Origenes hävdade att han gjort, och det är svårt att se hur Origenes kunnat dra en sådan slutsats från det som står i Judiska fornminnen 20:200.[96] Så, oavsett om detta därför är ett bevittnande av passagen i bok 20 av Judiska fornminnen,[97] ett bevittnande av en kristen interpolation som förekom i Origenes text men som inte överlevde,[98] eller om Origenes blandat samman Josefus med den grekiskkristne författaren och krönikören Hegesippos (ca 110–ca 180 vt) och egentligen bevittnar vad Hegesippos hade skrivit,[99] påstod Origenes att Josefus skrivit att Jesus ”kallades Kristus/Messias”. Eftersom detta yttrande kan anses likvärdigt med den hypotetiska meningen i Testimonium Flavianum där Josefus föreslås ha skrivit att Jesus ”förmodades vara Kristus/Messias” försvagas argumentet om ett Testimonium Flavianum med en annan formulering, så att Josefus inte själv nödvändigtvis måste hålla med om att Jesus var Messias.[100] Uttrycket ”han kallades Messias” (som Origenes faktiskt säger att Josefus har skrivit) kan förklara Origenes påstående att Josefus ”inte erkände Jesus som Messias” lika bra som det hypotetiska ”han förmodades vara Messias” (som Origenes inte bevittnar).[101][102]

6) Ett ursprungligt Testimonium Flavianum hos Agapius

Ett arabiskt historieverk, skrivet av biskop Agapius av Hierapolis år 941/942, innehåller en kortare och mindre kristen variant av Testimonium Flavianum, och Shlomo Pines och fler efter honom anser att den versionen bättre speglar det Josefus ursprungligen kan ha skrivit.[103][104] I Agapius version ifrågasätts inte om Jesus är en man, hans gärningar sägs inte vara mirakulösa, judarna har ingen roll i hans död, det är lärjungarna och inte Josefus själv som påstås ha sett honom uppstånden och han sägs bara kanske vara Messias.[105] Men bara en av de tre tänkta kristna interpolationerna saknas, om än de övriga är förändrade. Och även sådant som antas vara skrivet av Josefus saknas, som ”ända till nu har de kristnas stam, uppkallad efter honom, inte dött ut”, liksom formuleringar som anses typiska för Josefus. Således är det både uttryckligen kristna och mindre kristna formuleringar som är annorlunda eller saknas[106] Som beskrivits ovan har Alice Whealey argumenterat för att Agapius version blott är en nedtonad variant som bygger på Eusebios ”fulla” återgivning av passagen.[107]

7) Pseudo-Hegesippos: ett latinskt pre-eusebiskt bevittnande utan ”han var Kristus”

Ett anonymt latinskt historieverk som benämns Pseudo-Hegesippos[108] och som framför allt är baserat på Josefus Om det judiska kriget, innehåller en fri parafras av Testimonium Flavianum.[109] Verket dateras som regel till någon gång perioden 370–375.[110] Alice Whealey hävdar att allt väsentligt i Testimonium Flavianum finns parafraserat i texten förutom Pilatus dömande av Jesus och att Jesus var Messias. Eftersom författaren, frånsett Josefus verk, förefaller bygga på enbart latinska och inte grekiska källor och Eusebios vid denna tid sannolikt inte fanns översatt till latin, argumenterar hon för att detta skulle visa att Pseudo-Hegesippos hade tillgång till Josefus Judiska fornminnen vari det förekom en version av Testimonium Flavianum med endast den avvikelsen från den normativa att där stod ”han ansågs vara Kristus”.[111] Carleton Paget anser det dock osannolikt att Pseudo-Hegesippos skulle ha kunnat undgå att hänvisa till Jesus som Messias om ordet Messias funnits med.[112] Vidare, eftersom Pseudo-Hegesippos följer samma ordning som den i Judiska fornminnen men motsatt den hos Eusebios genom att först berätta om Jesus och därefter Johannes döparen, antas han inte ha använt Eusebios som källa för Testimonium Flavianum,[113] inte minst för att han hämtar annat från Judiska fornminnen.[114] Dock är Pseudo-Hegesippos tolkning mycket fri och det faktum att han bygger på Josefus utesluter inte att han också bygger på Eusebios.

Mot detta kan invändas att såvitt känt fanns inte heller Judiska fornminnen översatt till latin vid denna tid[115] och därmed fanns heller ingen latinsk version av Testimonium Flavianum tillgänglig för Pseudo-Hegesippos. Vidare finns tecken på att Pseudo-Hegesippos verkligen kunde grekiska, om än inte flytande.[116] Ken Olson har föreslagit en annan tolkning av texten än den Alice Whealey gör. Han argumenterar för att ”även de främsta männen i synagogan som överlämnade honom till döden erkände hans gudomlighet”[117] hos Pseudo-Hegesippos är en parafras och ett missförstånd av det stycke i Testimonium Flavianum som i direktöversättning lyder ”Messias denne var och honom på anklagelse/angivelse av de främsta männen hos oss till påle Pilatus havande dömt”. Eftersom ”han var Messias” saknas i Pseudo-Hegesippos mycket fria tolkning och det enda av relevans som tillkommit hos honom och som inte förekommer i Testimonium Flavianum är att de ledande judarna erkände Jesu gudomlighet (ett i sig häpnadsväckande påstående) föreslår Olson att Pseudo-Hegesippos hämtat uttrycket från Testimonium Flavianum. Olson föreslår att Pseudo-Hegesippos, framför allt om denne inte var så kunnig i grekiska, tolkat texten så att de ledande judarnas anklagelse mot Jesus var att han var Messias. Därmed skulle de ha erkänt honom som Messias och därigenom också bejakat hans gudomlighet. I så fall återgav Pseudo-Hegesippos i sin fria tolkning bara den normativa versionen av Testimonium Flavianum. Han kan också ha byggt på Eusebios återgivning av passagen ett drygt halvt århundrade tidigare,[118] och om inte, skrev Pseudo-Hegesippos ändå så pass sent att passagen skulle ha hunnit infogas i den kopia av Judiska fornminnen som han sannolikt hade tillgång till.[119]

8) Om de kristna delarna avlägsnas återstår en text som Josefus kan ha skrivit

Om de tre oftast åberopade textpartierna avlägsnas ur Testimonium Flavianum kommer återstoden att både likna Josefus stil och bilda en sammanhängande text som är logisk. Dessutom är denna kvarvarande text inte så översvallande positiv som man kunde förvänta sig om en kristen person hade skrivit också den.[120][121] Detta talar för att Josefus skrivit något om Jesus och att denna ursprungliga text senare utökats med annat material av mer kristen karaktär.[122][123]

Mot detta kan invändas att även det som då blir kvar innehåller positiva omdömen om Jesus av den sort som rimligen endast en som sympatiserade med kristendomen skulle skriva; som exempelvis att Jesus var en vis man, att han gjorde förunderliga gärningar, att den kristna läran var sanningen och att de ledande männen bland judarna dömde Jesus till döden.[124] Det som plockas bort avviker heller inte nämnvärt språkligt från återstoden.[125] Och de delar som man vill plocka bort är logiskt sammanlänkade med de delar som blir kvar (se punkt 10 under ”Argument till stöd för förfalskning i sin helhet”).

9) Slaviska Josefus eller Testimonium Slavianum

I ett 30-tal handskrifter på gammalryska av Josefus Om det judiska kriget (inte Judiska fornminnen) finns en variant av Testimonium Flavianum. Denna fria slaviska tolkning av Om det judiska kriget[126] finns bevarad i ryska och rumänska handskrifter från 1400-talet och senare,[127] och innehåller åtta kristna stycken vilka saknas i alla kända grekiska Josefus-handskrifter.[128] Tre av styckena handlar om Johannes döparen och fyra om Jesus.[129] Det stycke som mest liknar Testimonium Flavianum (åtminstone i inledningen) innehåller mycket mer text än vad den normativa versionen gör med korta förvrängda berättelser ur evangelierna; berättelser som påminner om många av dem som förekommer i senare apokryfiska kristna texter.[130] Robert Eisler har argumenterat för att dessa texter bevarat material från Josefus arameiska version av Om det judiska kriget som utkom före den grekiska versionen.[131] Men även om de ryska texterna sannolikt är översättningar gjorda på 1000- eller 1100-talet från grekiska förlagor,[132] är det i dag ytterst få som delar Eislers syn. Nästan samtliga kritiker anser att det rör sig om medeltida fabrikationer gjorda av någon kristen eller jude och att texterna inte har sin grund i något Josefus skrivit.[133][134][135]

 

Referenser

Noter

  1. ^ Alice Whealey, Josephus on Jesus, The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Late Antiquity to Modern Times, Studies in Biblical Literature 36. (New York: Peter Lang, 2003), s. 1–5.
  2. ^ Bland dem som under de senaste årtiondena försvarat tesen att Josefus skrivit hela Testimonium Flavianum märks Étienne Nodet, ”Jésus et Jean-Baptiste selon Josèphe,” Revue biblique 92 (1985), s. 321–48 & 497–524; The Emphasis on Jesus’ Humanity in the Kerygma , s. 721–753, i James H. Charlesworth, Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions, Princeton-Prague Symposium 2007, (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 2014); A. Vincent Cernuda, “El testimonio Flaviano. Alarde de solapada ironia”, Estudios Biblicos 55 (1997), s. 355–385 & 479–508; och Victor, Ulrich, “Das Testimonium Flavianum: Ein authentischer Text des Josephus,” Novum Testamentum 52 (2010), s. 72-82.
  3. ^ John P. Meier, ”Jesus in Josephus: A Modest Proposal,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 52 (1990), s. 78.
  4. ^ Bland de under senare årtionden mer inflytelserika forskare som hävdat denna position kan nämnas John P. Meier, Steve Mason, Géza Vermès, Alice Whealey (som föreslår endast minimala tillägg), James Carleton Paget (som tror att Josefus skrivit något om Jesus men säger sig inse svagheten i ett sådant antagande: ”I am as clear as anyone about the weaknesses of such a position”, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 603) och Louis Feldman (som ändå är öppen för att Eusebios skapat passage: “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 26–27).
  5. ^ Bland dem som under de senaste årtiondena argumenterat för att hela Testimonium Flavianum är en kristen förfalskning märks Leon Herrmann, Crestos: Temoignages paiens et juifs sur le christianisme du premier siecle (Collection Latomus 109; Brussels: Latomus, 1970); Heinz Schreckenberg, Die Flavius-Josephus-Tradition in Antike und Mittelalter, Arbeiten zur Literatur und Geschichte des Hellenistischen Judentums 5, (Leiden: Brill, 1972), s. 173; Tessa Rajak, Josephus, the Historian and His Society (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1983) ; J. Neville Birdsall, ”The Continuing Enigma of Josephus’s Testimony about Jesus,” Bulletin of the John Rylands University of Manchester 67 (1984-85), s. 609-22; Per Bilde, ”Josefus’ beretning om Jesus”, Dansk Teologisk Tidsskrift 44, s. 99–135, Flavius Josephus between Jerusalem and Rome: his Life, his Works and their Importance (JSPSup 2; Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1988), s. 222–223; Kurt Schubert (med Heinz Schreckenberg), Jewish Historiography and Iconography in Early Christian and Medieval Christianity, Vol.1, Josephus in Early Christian Literature and Medieval Christian Art (Assen and Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992), s. 38–41; Ken Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 305–322; ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 97–114; och Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 489–514.
  6. ^ Louis H. Feldman, Josephus and Modern Scholarship (1937-1980) (Berlin: W. de Gruyter, 1984).
  7. ^ Louis H. Feldman, ”A Selective Critical Bibliography of Josephus”, i Louis H. Feldman, Gōhei Hata (eds.), Josephus, the Bible, and History (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1989), s. 430.
  8. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 579.
  9. ^ Alice Whealey, Josephus on Jesus, The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Late Antiquity to Modern Times, Studies in Biblical Literature 36. (New York: Peter Lang, 2003), s. 31–33.
  10. ^ [ab] Robert E. Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), s. 93.
  11. ^ Andreas J. Köstenberger, L. Scott Kellum, Charles L. Quarles, The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown: An Introduction to the New Testament (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Academic, 2009), s. 107.
  12. ^ Översättningen är gjord av Bengt Holmberg och återfinns i Bengt Holmberg, Människa och mer: Jesus i forskningens ljus, 2., rev. uppl. (Lund: Arcus, 2005), s. 123. Samma text med endast den skillnaden att där står ”uppkallade” (vilket alltså senare korrigerats till ”uppkallad”) förekommer också i 1. uppl., Lund: Arcus, 2001, s. 132. Den text som i citatet är markerad i fetstil är i boken kursiverad och utgörs av det Holmberg anser vara ”kristna interpolationer”.
  13. ^”Perseus, Flavius Josephus, Antiquitates Judaicae, 18:63–64 (18.3.3), B. Niese, Ed.”.
  14. ^ Verket skrevs på grekiska och dess grekiska namn är Ἰουδαϊκὴ ἀρχαιολογία (Ioudaikē archaiologia). Det färdigställdes enligt Josefus under Domitianus trettonde regeringsår (Josefus Flavius, Judiska fornminnen 20:267). Detta svarar mot perioden september 93–september 94.
  15. ^ Codex Ambrosianus (Mediolanensis) F. 128 superior. Roger Pearse. ”Josephus: the Main Manuscripts of ”Antiquities””.
  16. ^ Eusebios återger stycket tre gånger; i Demonstratio Evangelica 3:5:104–106, i Kyrkohistoria 1:11:7–8 och i Theofania 5:43b–44 (bevarad endast i översättning till syriska).
  17. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament, (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 168.
  18. ^ Paul Winter “Excursus II – Josephus on Jesus and James” i The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ vol. I (trans. of Emil Schürer, Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, (1901 – 1909), a new and rev. English version edited by G. Vermes and F. Millar, Edinburgh, 1973), s. 434.
  19. ^ Gary J. Goldberg, “The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus,” Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha 13 (1995), s. 59–77. Se ”The Coincidences of the Emmaus Narrative of Luke and the Testimonium of Josephus, s. 2”.
  20. ^ Steve Mason skriver att eftersom grekiskans christos betyder smord och fuktad (”wetted”) skulle ett uttryck som att Jesus var fuktad ha tett sig helt obegripligt för den som inte var införstådd med det judiska Messiasbegreppet. Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 165–166.
  21. ^ “Because Josephus was not a Christian, few people believe that he actually wrote these words [syftande på de messianska anspråken]; they may well have been added by scribes in later Christian circles which preserved his work. But the rest of his statements fit his style elsewhere and are most likely authentic.” Craig L. Blomberg, ”Gospels (Historical Reliability),” i Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, Joel B. Green, Scot McKnight, et al.( eds.) (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1992), s. 293.
  22. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 59–61, 74–75.
  23. ^ Eftersom språket är så pass likvärdigt i hela Testimonium Flavianum kan Alice Whealey argumentera för att i stort sett hela passagen är skriven av Josefus. Se Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4 (2008), s. 588; Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 95, 115–116, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  24. ^ “Hence, in the case of the three interpolations, the major argument against their authenticity is from content.” John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 83, n. 42.
  25. ^ Géza Vermès, ”The Jesus Notice of Josephus Re-Examined,” Journal of Jewish Studies 38 (1987), s. 2.
  26. ^ Avvikelserna består av varianter i uttryck hos kyrkofäder antingen när de citerade stycket eller, som ofta, parafraserade och sammanfattade det. Det är av den anledningen svårt att veta i vad mån dessa varianter beror på att deras förlaga avvek från den normativa texten eller om de själva tog sig friheter i sin tolkning av texten. I de fall deras versioner uttrycker fientlighet överensstämmer de sällan med varandra. Se James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 209–214.
  27. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 213–216.
  28. ^ De slaviska versionerna räknas då inte med eftersom de egentligen är senare gjorda ombearbetningar med mängder av tillägg. Se punkt 9) ”Slaviska Josefus eller Testimonium Slavianum ” under rubriken ”Argument till stöd för äkthet”.
  29. ^ Shlomo Pines, An Arabic Version of the Testimonium Flavianum and its Implications (Jerusalem: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1971).
  30. ^ Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4 (2008), s. 573–590.
  31. ^ Ken Olson. Agapius’ testimonium, Crosstalk2”.
  32. ^ Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4, 2008, s. 580.
  33. ^ Både i bokens inledning och i dess slut skriver Hieronymus att han färdigställde verket i kejsar Theodosius fjortonde år, vilket inföll 19 januari år 392 och avslutades 18 januari år 393.
  34. ^ Rosamond McKitterick, History and memory in the Carolingian world (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), s. 226.
  35. ^ Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4, 2008, s. 580–581.
  36. ^ ”Latin and Syriac writers did not read each others’ works in late antiquity. Both, however, had access to Greek works. The only plausible conclusion is that Jerome and some Syriac Christian (probably the seventh century James of Edessa) both had access to a Greek version of the Testimonium containing the passage ‘he was believed to be the Christ’ rather than ‘he was the Christ.’” Alice Whealey. The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Antiquity to the Present, s. 10, n. 8.”. Se också Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 90, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007); och ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4 (2008), s. 580–581.
  37. ^ Robert Eisler, Iesous Basileus ou Basileusas, vol 1 (Heidelberg: Winter, 1929), s. 68.
  38. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 493–494.
  39. ^ Marian Hillar, ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Vol. 13, Houston, TX., 2005, s. 66–103. Se ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus, s. 16, 22.”.
  40. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 60.
  41. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 493–494.
  42. ^ Till stöd för detta antagande finns tre syriska handskrifter. (MS B) från 500-talet och (MS A) från år 462 innehåller båda Eusebios Kyrkohistoria där också Testimonium Flavianum finns översatt till syriska (se Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4, 2008, s. 584). Den äldsta syriska handskriften med Testimonium Flavianum i Eusebios Theofania är så gammal som från år 411. (William Hatch, An album of dated Syriac manuscripts, Boston, 1946, s. 52–54.) På grund av de många avskriftsfelen dessa handskrifter innehåller tros de vara flera avskrifter från originalöversättningarna. Ett sådant syriskt original antas ha legat till grund för den översättning till armeniska av Eusebios Kyrkohistoria som gjordes i början av 400-talet. Såväl de syriska handskrifterna som den armeniska texten (”∙Քրիստոսիսկէնա.”) har han ”var” Messias
  43. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 216.
  44. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 209.
  45. ^ Paul L. Maier, Josephus, the Essential Works: A Condensation of “Jewish Antiquities” and “the Jewish War”, transl. and ed, Paul L. Maier (Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1994), s. 284.
  46. ^ Robert E. Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), s. 88.
  47. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 62.
  48. ^ Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 20.
  49. ^ De bevarade grekiska handskrifterna innehållande Testimonium Flavianum är A Milan, Codex Ambrosianus (Mediolanensis) F. 128 superior (1000-talet); M Florens, Codex Medicaeus bibl. Laurentianae plut. 69, cod. 10 (1400-talet); W Rom, Codex Vaticanus Graecus 984 (år 1354). Dessa tre handskrifter, A, M och W, tillhör samma familj av handskrifter. (Roger Pearse. ”Josephus: the Main Manuscripts of ”Antiquities””.)
  50. ^George A. Wells, The Jesus Legend (Chicago: Open Court, 1996), s. 51.
  51. ^ J. Neville Birdsall, ”The Continuing Enigma of Josephus’ Testimony about Jesus,” Bulletin of the John Rylands Library of Manchester 67 (1984-85), s. 610.
  52. ^ Se exempelvis Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 90, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007), framför allt s. 104.
  53. ^ Géza Vermès, ”The Jesus Notice of Josephus Re-Examined,” Journal of Jewish Studies 38 (1987), s. 1–10.
  54. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament, (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 171.
  55. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 62–63.
  56. ^ Josefus Flavius, Judiska fornminnen 8:53, 10:237.
  57. ^ Josefus Flavius, Judiska fornminnen 9:182, 12:63.
  58. ^ “In brief, there seems to be no stylistic or historical argument that might be marshalled against the authenticity of the two phrases in question.” Géza Vermès, ”The Jesus Notice of Josephus Re-Examined,” Journal of Jewish Studies 38 (1987), s. 4.
  59. ^ Paula Fredriksen, Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews: A Jewish Life and the Emergence of Christianity (New York: Vintage Books, 2000), s. 248.
  60. ^ Steve Mason, Josephus and the New Testament, (Peabody: Massachusetts, 1992), s. 169–170.
  61. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 100.
  62. ^ J. Neville Birdsall, ”The Continuing Enigma of Josephus’s Testimony about Jesus,” Bulletin of the John Rylands University of Manchester 67 (1984-85), s. 621.
  63. ^ ”J’accorde que le style de Josèphe est adroitement imité, ce qui n’était peut-être pas très difficile …” Charles Guignebert, Jésus, Bibliothèque de Synthèse Historique: L’évolution de L’humanité, Henri Berr (ed.), vol.29 (Paris: La Renaissance du Livre, 1933), s. 19.
  64. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 221.
  65. ^ Robert E. Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), s. 89–90.
  66. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 105–108.
  67. ^ Också Feldman noterar att detta stämmer med Eusebios föreställning att det var förutbestämt att Jesu budskap skulle nå alla folk och att hans underverk skulle vinna dem över till den kristna läran. Se Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 22.
  68. ^ Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 25.
  69. ^ Ken Olson. ””The Testimonium Flavianum, Eusebius, and Consensus””.
  70. ^ Josefus Flavius, Judiska fornminnen 8:53, 10:237; Géza Vermès, Jesus in His Jewish Context (London: SCM Press, 2003), s. 92.
  71. ^Earl Doherty, Jesus: Neither God Nor Man – The Case for a Mythical Jesus (Ottawa: Age of Reason Publications, 2009), s. 535.
  72. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 62.
  73. ^ Craig A. Evans, Jesus and His Contemporaries: Comparative Studies (New York: Brill, 1995), s. 44.
  74. ^ Craig A. Evans, Jesus in non-Christian sources, s. 469; i B. D. Chilton & C. A. Evans (eds), “Studying the Historical Jesus: Evaluations of the State of Current Research” (New Testament Tools and Studies 19; Leiden: Brill 1994).
  75. ^ Origenes, Om Matteus 10:17, Mot Kelsos 1:47 & 2:13.
  76. ^ Géza Vermès, Jesus in the Jewish World (London : SMC Press, 2010), s. 39–40.
  77. ^ Tessa Rajak, Josephus, the Historian and His Society, 2. ed. (London: Gerald Duckworth, 2003), 1. ed. 1983, s. 131.
  78. ^ Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 314.
  79. ^ Paget påpekar att vi inte ska utesluta möjligheten av en kristen glossa: se James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 197, n. 46.
  80. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 489–514.
  81. ^ Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 314–315.
  82. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 496.
  83. ^ Origenes, Om Matteus 10:17, Mot Kelsos 1:47.
  84. ^ Géza Vermès, ”The Jesus Notice of Josephus Re-Examined,” Journal of Jewish Studies 38 (1987), s. 2.
  85. ^ Louis H. Feldman, “On the Authenticity of the Testimonium Flavianum Attributed to Josephus,” i New Perspectives on Jewish Christian Relations, ed. E. Carlebach & J. J. Schechter (Leiden: Brill, 2012), s. 15–16.
  86. ^ Shlomo Pines, An Arabic Version of the Testimonium Flavianum and its Implications (Jerusalem: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1971), s. 66.
  87. ^ Se också James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 205–206.
  88. ^ Origenes, Mot Kelsos 1:28, 1:47. Kelsos numera försvunna verk hette ”Sanningens ord” (grekiska: Logos Alêthês) och skrevs ca år 180.
  89. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 203.
  90. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 492.
  91. ^ Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 18:116–119.
  92. ^ Origenes, Mot Kelsos 1:47.
  93. ^ J. Neville Birdsall, ”The Continuing Enigma of Josephus’s Testimony about Jesus,” Bulletin of the John Rylands University of Manchester 67 (1984-85), s. 618.
  94. ^ Origenes, Om Matteus 10:17, Mot Kelsos 1:47 & 2:13.
  95. ^ Hos Josefus, Judiska fornminnen 20:200, står ”τὸν ἀδελφὸν Ἰησοῦ τοῦ λεγομένου Χριστοῦ” (ton adelfon Iêsou tou legomenou Christou). Origenes skriver ordagrant detsamma i Om Matteus 10:17 och Mot Kelsos 2:13 och har en variant med ”en broder” i stället för ”brodern” i Mot Kelsos 1:47: ὃς … ἀδελφὸς Ἰησοῦ τοῦ λεγομένου Χριστοῦ. Se Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 499–503.
  96. ^ Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 317–318.
  97. ^ Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 90, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  98. ^ Ken A. Olson, ”Eusebius and the Testimonium Flavianum,” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 61 (1999), s. 317–318.
  99. ^ Richard Carrier, ”Origen, Eusebius, and the Accidental Interpolation in Josephus, Jewish Antiquities 20.200”, Journal of Early Christian Studies, (Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter 2012), s. 507–511, 514.
  100. ^ Eledge påpekar att Origenes säger att Jesus inte erkände Jesus som Messias i ett sammanhang där han synbarligen behandlar Jakobpassagen. Casey D, Eledge, Josephus, Tacitus and Suetonius: Seeing Jesus through the Eyes of Classical Historians, s. 696–697, i Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions: The Second Princeton- Prague Symposium on Jesus Research, Princeton 2007, ed. James H. Charlesworth.
  101. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, i Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010), s. 203–204.
  102. ^ J. Neville Birdsall, ”The Continuing Enigma of Josephus’s Testimony about Jesus,” Bulletin of the John Rylands University of Manchester 67 (1984-85), s. 618.
  103. ^ Se Shlomo Pines, An Arabic Version of the Testimonium Flavianum and its Implications (Jerusalem: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1971).
  104. ^ Robert E. Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), s. 97–98.
  105. ^ Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4 (2008), s. 573–590.
  106. ^ Ken Olson. Agapius’ testimonium, Crosstalk2”.
  107. ^ Se Alice Whealey, ”The Testimonium Flavianum in Syriac and Arabic”, New Testament Studies 54.4, 2008, s. 573–590.
  108. ^ I medeltida handskrifter bär verket namnet De excidio urbis Hierosolymitanae (Om staden Jerusalems ödeläggelse). Namnet Pseudo-Hegesippos kommer av att verket felaktigt antagits vara skrivet av den kristne grekiske författaren Hegesippos som levde ca 110–ca 180 vt.
  109. ^ Pseudo-Hegesippos, De excidio Hierosolymitano 2:12.
  110. ^ Albert A. Bell JR, ”Josephus and Pseudo-Hegesippus”; i Louis H. Feldman, Gōhei Hata, Josephus, Judaism and Christianity (Detroit 1987), s. 350.
  111. ^ Alice Whealey, Josephus on Jesus, The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Late Antiquity to Modern Times, Studies in Biblical Literature 36. (New York: Peter Lang, 2003), s. 31–33.
  112. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 567.
  113. ^ James N. B. Carleton Paget, ”Some Observations on Josephus and Christianity”, Journal of Theological Studies 52:2 (2001), s. 566–567.
  114. ^ Alice Whealey, ”Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea, and the Testimonium Flavianum”, s. 79, n. 16, i Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007).
  115. ^ Emil Schürer, The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ: 175 B.C.–A.D. 135, Volume I (Edinburgh 1973), s. 58.
  116. ^ Marian Hillar, ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Vol. 13, Houston, TX., 2005, s. 66–103. Se ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus, s. 17.”.
  117. ^ Latinets deum fatebantur kan också översättas till ”erkände att han var Gud” som Alice Whealey gör: ”acknowledged him to be God”; Alice Whealey, Josephus on Jesus, The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Late Antiquity to Modern Times, Studies in Biblical Literature 36. (New York: Peter Lang, 2003), s. 32–33. Heinz Schreckenberg översätter det emellertid till ”erkände hans gudomlighet”: ”confessed his divinity”. Heinz Schreckenberg, Kurt Schubert (eds.), Jewish Historiography and Iconography in Early and Medieval Christianity, Assen and Maastricht 1992, s. 72.
  118. ^ Ken Olson. Pseudo-Hegesippus’ Testimonium, Crosstalk2”.
  119. ^ Marian Hillar, ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Vol. 13, Houston, TX., 2005, s. 66–103. Se ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus, s. 18”.
  120. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 61–62.
  121. ^ Géza Vermès, Jesus in the Jewish World (London : SMC Press, 2010), s. 41–44.
  122. ^ James Charlesworth, Jesus within Judaism: New Light from Exciting Archaeological Discoveries (New York: Doubleday, 1988), s. 93.
  123. ^ Robert E. Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), s. 96.
  124. ^ Earl Doherty, Jesus: Neither God Nor Man – The Case for a Mythical Jesus (Ottawa: Age of Reason Publications, 2009), s. 539–540.
  125. ^ Ken Olson, ”A Eusebian Reading of the Testimonium Flavianum” i Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations, ed. A. Johnson & J. Schott (Harvard University Press, 2013), s. 100.
  126. ^ Marian Hillar, ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Vol. 13, Houston, TX., 2005, s. 66–103. Se ”Flavius Josephus and His Testimony Concerning the Historical Jesus, s. 24.”.
  127. ^ De 30 bevarade handskrifterna är alla från perioden 1400-talet till 1700-talet – den äldsta är daterad till år 1463.
  128. ^ Roger Pearse (2002). ”Notes on the Old Slavonic Josephus”.
  129. ^ Instoppen om Jesus förekommer på motsvarande ställen i Om det judiska kriget 2:9:3 (eller 2:174), 5:5:2, 5:5:4 och 6:5:4).
  130. ^ Solomon Zeitlin, ”The Hoax of the ’Slavonic Josephus’”, The Jewish Quarterly Review, New Series, (Vol. 39, No. 2, Oct., 1948), s. 177.
  131. ^ Robert Eisler, The Messiah Jesus and John the Baptist: According to Flavius Josephus’ recently rediscovered ‘Capture of Jerusalem’ and the other Jewish and Christian sources, (London: Methuen, 1931).
  132. ^ Étienne Nodet, The Emphasis on Jesus’ Humanity in the Kerygma , s. 739, i James H. Charlesworth, Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions, Princeton-Prague Symposium 2007, (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 2014).
  133. ^ John P. Meier, A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol 1: The Roots of the Problem (New York: Doubleday, 1991), s. 57.
  134. ^ Alice Whealey. The Testimonium Flavianum Controversy from Antiquity to the Present, s. 7–8.”.
  135. ^ Robert E. Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000), s. 87–88.

An Occult Priestly Installation Ritual in the Secret Gospel of Mark

 

This is a guest post by David Blocker, refuting the presumptuous idea that the σινδόνα (linen cloth) the youth wore on his bare body when “Jesus taught him the mystery of the Kingdom of God” would imply eroticism or sexuality. Instead Blocker suggests that the scene should be interpreted as an installation rite for a new High Priest.

The article is also available as a pdf file (An Occult Priestly Installation Ritual in the Secret Gospel of Mark) in which the colour coding of certain phrases in the article are easier to see.

 

An Occult Priestly Installation Ritual in the Secret Gospel of Mark

by David Blocker

 

In 1960, Morton Smith announced the discovery of an 18th century handwritten transcription of a letter written by Clement of Alexandria in the late 2nd or early 3rd century. Clement’s letter was a response to an inquiry about a previously unknown version of the Gospel of Mark. Since the letter’s unveiling, it has been the subject of an ever escalating partisan madness, including accusations of forgery, academic fraud, postulated rituals of sex and death, and wildly imagined claims about the sexual predilections of the letter’s discoverer.

In this essay, an excerpt from the Secret Gospel of Mark quoted in Clement’s letter to Theodore, is compared to passages extracted from the Tanakh. The narrative sequence in the Secret Mark excerpt has multiple parallels to the descriptions of the installation rites for high priest. This suggests the claims that the long excerpt from the Secret Gospel of Mark has a homoerotic content are unfounded misinterpretations of the text [1].

The following passage was excerpted from Clement’s Letter to Theodore [2]. Phrases from the Secret Gospel of Mark that have parallels in the Tanakh have been color coded or noted with a special font (See below for parallel passages from the Tanakh).

“ … And a certain woman whose brother had died [ἀπέθανεν] was there. … And Jesus, … , went off with her into the garden where the tomb was, and straightway, going in to where the youth was, he stretched forth his hand and raised him [ἤγειρεν] (from the dead [3])… . And going out of the tomb they came into the house of the youth, for he was rich. And after six days [4] Jesus told [ἐπέταξεν] him what to do and in the evening the youth comes to him, wearing a linen cloth [σινδόνα] over his naked body [ἐπὶ γυμνοῦ]. And he remained with him that night, for Jesus taught him the mystery of the Kingdom of God. … .”

Compare the excerpt from the Secret Gospel of Mark to these passages from the Tanakh:

Exodus 28:41-43, “41And thou shalt put them upon Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him; and shalt anoint them, and consecrate them, and sanctify them, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office. 42 And thou shalt make them linen breeches to cover their nakedness; from the loins even unto the thighs they shall reach: 43And they shall be upon Aaron, and upon his sons, when they come in unto the tabernacle of the congregation, or when they come near unto the altar to minister in the holy place; that they bear not iniquity, and die: … [5]”

Ezekiel 44:18, “They are to wear linen turbans 5 on their heads and linen undergarments around their waists. They must not wear anything that makes them perspire.”

Leviticus 16:4 (Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition (DRA), “4 He shall be vested with a linen tunick, he shall cover his nakedness with linen breeches: he shall be girded with a linen girdle, and he shall put a linen mitre 6 upon his head: for these are holy vestments: all which he shall put on, after he is washed.”

 or,

Leviticus 16:4 (International Standard Version (©2012), “He is to wear a sacred linen tunic and linen undergarments that will cover his genitals. He is to clothe himself with a sash and wrap his head with a linen turban [6]. Because they are sacred garments, he is to wash himself with water before putting them on.”

Leviticus 16:23, “23 Then Aaron is and take off the linen garments he put on before he entered the Most Holy Place, and he is to leave them there.

Exodus 20:26;“And you must not go up by steps to my altar, so that your nakedness is not exposed”

Exodus 30:20 (New International Version (©2011)), “Whenever they enter the tent of meeting, they shall wash with water so that they will not die. Also, when they approach the altar to minister by presenting a food offering to the LORD,”

Leviticus 8:33-35: “Do not leave the entrance to the tent of meeting for seven days, until the days of your ordination are completed, for your ordination will last seven days. 34 What has been done today was commanded by the Lord to make atonement for you. 35 You must stay at the entrance to the tent of meeting day and night for seven days and do what the Lord requires, so you will not die; for that is what I have been commanded.”

Ezekiel 44:25-26, “A priest must not defile himself by going near a dead person; however, if the dead person was his father or mother, son or daughter, brother or unmarried sister, then he may defile himself. 26 After he is cleansed, he must wait seven days.”

Comparison of extracts from Secret Mark with extracts from the Tanakh. All the examples are drawn from the above texts.

Secret Gospel of Mark: wearing a linen cloth over his naked body

Exodus 28: 41-42 “ linen breeches to cover their nakedness

Ezekiel 44:19, “ They are to wear linen turbans 5 on their heads and linen undergarments around their waists

Leviticus 16:4 (Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition (DRA), “ he shall cover his nakedness with linen breeches: … linen mitre … .”

Leviticus 16:23, “ linen garments

 

Secret Gospel of Mark: And a certain woman whose brother had died was there.

Ezekiel 44:25, “A priest must not defile himself by going near a dead person; however, if the dead person was his father or mother, son or daughter, brother or unmarried sister, then he may defile himself.

 

Secret Gospel of Mark: “and raised him (from the dead 3)”

Leviticus 8:33; “so you will not die

Exodus 30:20; (New International Version (©2011)), “so that they will not die.”

 

Secret Gospel of Mark: “Jesus told him what to do

Leviticus 8:34: “What has been done today was commanded by the Lordthat is what I have been commanded.”

 

Secret Gospel of Mark: “And after six days 4

Leviticus 8:33-35: “ … seven days, … your ordination will last seven days. … 35 … seven days… ”

Ezekiel 44:25-26, “ … he must wait seven days.”

 

Secret Gospel of Mark: “naked body

Exodus 28:42, “nakedness

Leviticus 16:4 (Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition (DRA), “nakedness

Exodus 20:26;“ … nakedness … ”

 

Secret Gospel of Mark: “And going out of the tomb they came into the house of the youth, for he was rich. And after six days 4”

Leviticus 8:33-35: “Do not leave the entrance to the tent of meeting for seven days, … 35 You must stay at the entrance to the tent of meeting day and night for seven days … ”

 

The “house of the youth” where he stayed for six or seven days prior to his meeting with Jesus, seems to play the role of the tent of meeting where the high priest elect stayed prior to the final installation ceremony.

Although there are clear parallels in the translations, the Secret Gospel of Mark is written in Greek and the Tanakh passages in Hebrew. In the Greek translation of the Tanakh, the Septuagint, the nakedness is expressed in words like χρωτὸς (skin or body) and ἀσχημοσύνη (shame, that which is unseemly) while Secret Mark has the expressionἐπὶ γυμνοῦ (on his bare body). Secret Mark has σινδόνα (linen cloth) while the Septuagint has λίνος (linen) combined with the article of clothing. Both use the same word for “to die” (ἀποθνῄσκω) but different words for commanding (ἐπιτάσσω and ἐντέλλομαι), etcetera.

Accordingly comparison of the text of the Secret Gospel of Mark to selected texts from the Tanakh demonstrate a similar vocabulary if translation effect is taken into account. The latter texts describe how to perform the ritual for instructing and sanctifying a new high priest. There is no hint of eroticism in the passages from the Tanakh. Both the Tanakh and the Secret Gospel of Mark state that the person undergoing instruction wore a linen (under)garment. In the Tanakh they did so in order to preserve their modesty and there is every reason to suppose that this was the motive also in the Secret Mark scene. Based on the language shared by the Tanakh and the Secret Gospel of Mark there is no reason to assume that the passage from the Secret Gospel of Mark describes a homoerotic ritual. Furthermore, the transmitter of the excerpt from the Secret Gospel of Mark, Clement of Alexandria, does not ascribe any reprehensible properties to the text. Clement counsels Theodore, the recipient of his letter, that it is only the corrupted version used by the Carpocratians that is heretical and salacious [1].

Additionally, it is hard to see why certain critics of the text assumed that the rich young man’s love for Jesus was homosexual in nature. The same terminology is used to describe Jesus’ affection for Lazarus [7], and for the disciple who allegedly composed the Gospel of John, the disciple Jesus loved [8]. No mainstream bible interpreter has accused Jesus of harboring homosexual thoughts, in spite of his love for these two men. Peter also declared his love for Jesus [9], yet the mainstream theological literature has never accused him of lusting after Jesus. Thus it seems that the definition of the word “love” has been inconsistently applied by some of the critics of Secret Mark.

If one is to find a match in the ancient literature for the ritual the rich young man in the Secret Gospel of Mark underwent, a possible match is the ritual for installing a new high priest as set forth in the Tanakh. If this was actually the case, then the author of the Secret Gospel of Mark was doing his best to keep the true nature of the ritual occult, or hidden from the casual reader. The text hints that Jesus had ordained a new High Priest to supplant the incumbent High Priest, Joseph ben Caiaphas, who was maintained in office by the Romans.

This supposititious ordination occurs at a point in the canonical Gospel of Mark’s narrative immediately before Jesus’ march on Jerusalem[10]. Therefore, the suspicion is raised that Jesus had planned to overthrow the Romans and their quisling High Priest, and install a replacement High Priest who was more to his liking. Having an overtly political and militant Jesus as the nominal founder of Christianity would not have found favor with the rulers of the Roman Empire, so it is not surprising that the Secret Gospel of Mark was kept a secret.

Acknowledgements: I want to extend my gratitude to Roger Viklund for his editorial assistance.

 

David Blocker

2014/05

 

[1]) On the other hand, Clement wrote to Theodore that the heretical Carpocratians had a spurious version of the text which did narrate unseemly carnal acts.The Carpocratian version of the Gospel of Mark apparently contained the phrase γυμνὸς γυμνῷ,naked man with naked man, which, according to Clement, was not found in the original version of the Secret Gospel of Mark.

Clement wrote this about the Carpocratian text:

“But since the foul demons are always devising destruction for the race of men, Carpocrates, instructed by them and using deceitful arts, so enslaved a certain presbyter of the church in Alexandria that he got from him a copy of the Secret Gospel, which he both interpreted according to his blasphemous and carnal doctrine and, moreover, polluted, mixing with the spotless and holy words utterly shameless lies. From this mixture is derived the teachings of the Carpocratians.”

[2]) The complete quotation of the Secret Mark excerpt:

“And they come into Bethany. And a certain woman whose brother had died was there. And, coming, she prostrated herself before Jesus and says to him, ‘Son of David, have mercy on me’. But the disciples rebuked her. And Jesus, being angered, went off with her into the garden where the tomb was, and straightway, going in where the youth was, he stretched forth his hand and raised him, seizing his hand. But the youth, looking upon him, loved him and began to beseech him that he might be with him. And going out of the tomb they came into the house of the youth, for he was rich. And after six days Jesus told him what to do and in the evening the youth comes to him, wearing a linen cloth over his naked body. And he remained with him that night, for Jesus taught him the mystery of the Kingdom of God. And thence, arising, he returned to the other side of the Jordan.”

[3]) “from the dead” inserted for clarity. See John 11:44 from the Raising of Lazarus story, which parallels the Secret Gospel of Mart narrative.

[4]) If the day the young man emerged from the tomb is counted as day one instead of day zero, then the rich young man’s meeting with Jesus occurred seven days after he exited the tomb. This way of counting days seems to have been a contemporary practice. Jesus’ resurrection on the third day is another example of this style of counting (Mid day Friday to early Sunday morning is counted as “three days”.)

[5]) Presumably the fatal iniquity referred to in Exodus 28:43 is the priest inadvertently exposing his genitals when he approaches the altar. The linen undergarment described in Exodus 28:42 would prevent this dread event and preserve the high priest’s modesty. Exodus 20:26 prohibits exposing oneself when mounting the altar.

[6]) John 11:44 (New International Version (NIV)), “44 The dead man came out, his hands and feet wrapped with strips of linen, and a cloth around his face. Jesus said to them, ‘Take off the grave clothes and let him go’.”

Both John 11:44 and Leviticus 16:4 refer to head wrappings. The text of John11, the Raising of Lazarus, is a literary analogue of the excerpt from the Secret Gospel of Mark (http://rogerviklund.wordpress.com/2011/09/29/overlaps-between-secret-mark-the-raising-of-lazarus-in-john-and-the-gerasene-swine-episode-in-mark/).

[7]) John 11:5; “Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.”John 11:36; “Then the Jews said, “See how he loved him!” The word love (Greek: agapaô, phileô) is used to describe what Jesus called his friendship with Lazarus:

John 11:11; “After he had said this, he went on to tell them, “Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep; but I am going there to wake him up.” ”

[8]) John 13:23, John 19:26, John 21:7, John 21:20.

[9]) The disciple Peter also admitted his love for Jesus (John 21:15-17) but no mainstream Bible interpreter has ever imputed a homosexual underpinning to Peter’s love for Jesus.

[10]) Mark 11:7-11, Jesus’ so called Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem.

Philip Jenkins’ New Parallel to Secret Mark: “Anglo-Saxon Attitudes”

Philip Jenkins, Distinguished Professor of History at Baylor University, has published the article Alexandrian Attitudes: A new source for the “Secret Gospel of Mark.” in Books and Culture: A Christian Review.

I read the article yesterday and commented upon it today on Tony Burke’s blog Apocryphicity; Philip Jenkins’ New Parallel to Secret Mark: “Anglo-Saxon Attitudes”. I decided to turn my comment into a regular blog post.

Jenkins was the one who first (in 2001) suggested that Morton Smith had read Hunter’s novel “The Mystery of Mar Saba” and from that got inspired to forge Clement’s letter to Theodoros including quotations made from a Secret Gospel of Mark. I have dealt with that so-called parallel to some degree in my blog post Allan J. Pantuck on the Secret Gospel of Mark.

In Alexandrian Attitudes Jenkins has found a new parallel to the Secret Gospel of Mark in Angus Wilson’s 1956 novel Anglo-Saxon Attitudes. The plot in Jenkins’ own summary is as follows:

“Wilson’s novel synthesizes these three episodes. He describes the 1912 excavation at the Anglo-Saxon site of Melpham, which features the grave of a celebrated 7th- century missionary bishop named Eorpwald. (The date recalls Piltdown, the setting suggests Sutton Hoo.) To the astonishment of the chief excavator, Lionel Stokesay, Eorpwald’s grave includes a phallic fertility idol. The only explanation the archaeologists can suggest is that, in these dark early centuries, even the leaders of the venerated Anglo-Saxon church practiced a clandestine syncretism, a dual faith. The heroic Eorpwald was an apostate.

By the time of the novel’s main action in the 1950s, that shocking theory has achieved a grudging consensus status among British historians. It is particularly welcomed by ”Rose Lorimer,” a thinly disguised version of the eccentric real-life scholar Margaret Murray, the inventor of many modern theories about the history of witchcraft and neo-paganism.”

To learn the plot more thoroughly you could read this Wikipedia article. I’ll turn to Jenkins’ arguments.

The parallels presented by Jenkins are as follows:

1)      Gilbert in Anglo-Saxon Attitudes sought to disgrace and embarrass the historical establishment who was stupid enough to believe an obvious hoax. Also Smith did the same thing.

2)      Wilson was openly gay and also Smith was (possibly) gay or at least bisexual.

3)      The items were in both cases “faked” in order make the church confront the possibility that those early predecessors themselves were open to unrestrained “pagan” sexuality.

4)      Anglo-Saxon Attitudes had a particular appeal for readers interested in scholarship or in accurate accounts of the scholarly world and for those who were gay. Smith would then have had a particular interest in such a novel.

5)      Both were forgeries planted in early Christian sites.

6)      In both plots there was a man named Theodore.

7)      The intrusive item promises to rewrite church history, by proving that Christian orthodoxy co-existed with controversial clandestine practices.

8)      Both cases include dual religions where both shadow religions have a strong sexual content.

The first five arguments are only focused on Smith and not on the artifact itself. Also, the arguments presuppose that Secret Mark in fact IS a forgery and that Smith was the culprit. But they are only relevant if Smith was gay (for which there are no proofs, and even if he were, would it be relevant?), that he would have been interested in that book and its themes, that he wanted to embarrass the establishment and to promote a gay view; all which are unsupported suggestions which need to be proven before they can be used as proof (to avoid circular reasoning).

The remaining three arguments focus upon the parallels between “Anglo-Saxon Attitudes” and “Secret Mark”. In “Anglo-Saxon Attitudes” the forged phallic fertility idol is placed in the grave of bishop Eorpwald, “who is identified as a disciple of the great English Archbishop Theodore.” In both plots there is then, according to Jenkins, a man named Theodore. This, however, is only true to some degree. The otherwise unknown person that Clement is writing his letter to is named Theodoros and not Theodore. Theodore is of course an English (or proto-English) adaption of the Greek name. I doubt that the Theodore in “Anglo-Saxon Attitudes” also was known by the name of Theodoros. At least that name does not occur in the book and if that Theodore is based on an actual bishop (i.e. Archbishop Theodore of Canterbury), that man was probably also known by just the name Theodore.

Jenkins suggests that both findings promise to rewrite church history, by proving that Christian orthodoxy co-existed with controversial clandestine practices. And that is true. But seriously, how strange would that be? Secret Mark is a controversial text. But how difficult would it be to find a novel in which there is a controversial discovery made? Any thrilling novels in which discoveries are made are bound to include controversial discoveries. That is the genre of such novels.

Finally both shadow religions have, according to Jenkins, a strong sexual content. But then of course there is nothing sexual at all in Secret Mark. In the letter, Clement deals with an alleged sexual plot with a naked man with a naked man, but he strongly opposes that such a text was part of Secret Mark and the quotation he presents shows nothing of the kind.

So this so-called parallel is even more far-fetched than the one with “The Mystery of Mar Saba” and the only relevant parallel are the names Theodore – Theodoros. The name Theodore is though a very common ecclesiastical name.

However, I do wonder a bit about the mathematics in the scenario put forward by Jenkins. I have a really hard time understanding how he can envision that this “parallel” would make it more likely that Smith was influenced by fictional novels to make a forgery. Let’s follow Jenkins in his logic and see where it ends. He writes the following:

“In order to grant the truth of Morton Smith’s alleged discovery of the Mar Saba letter, at the particular time and place, we must accept an outrageous series of coincidences, to which we must now add explicit echoes of two separate contemporary novels. At some point, surely, Occam’s Razor requires us to seek the simplest explanation for the whole Mar Saba affair.”

Jenkins accordingly thinks that two parallels would be a stronger proof that Smith was influenced to forge the Mar Saba letter. Even though this parallel is a really weak parallel, for the sake of argument let’s presume it was a strong one. So, then we have two novels that might have influenced Smith. Which one was it then that influenced him? Is Jenkins suggesting that it was both and that they combined made a stronger impact than they would have done separately? Let’s say that we find another novel and another novel and another novel with parallels. Would it then be even more likely that Smith forged the text if we have five parallels? If we found a hundred novels (which possibly could be made if we simply need to find such superficial parallels as the ones found in “Anglo-Saxon Attitudes”) would it then be almost impossible that Secret Mark was genuine?

The truth is that the more parallels we can find, the less likely it is that Smith was influenced by anyone of these. Instead it shows that forgeries are a common theme in many novels and given that many tens of thousands such books has been written, there is nothing strange that occasional parallels to genuine events and artifacts can be found if you search through all the books available.

Roger Viklund, April 20, 2014

Non sequitur i “Jesus Outside the New Testament”

Jag har på sistone läst (i) ett antal böcker vilka alla på olika sätt fått mig att tvivla på den mänskliga tankeförmågan. Det är lätt deprimerande att läsa vissa saker och ibland blir jag faktiskt tvungen att lägga ifrån mig det jag för stunden läser för att jag inte längre uthärdar läsningen. Det blir någon form av intellektuell härdsmälta. Främst är det väl alla dumheter om Hemliga Markus som forskare vräker ur sig, men det gäller också mycket annat. Och inte lär det väl bli bättre när jag framöver ska ta itu med Maurice Caseys senast försök att bemöta mytikernas, eller Jesus-minimalisternas, påstående om att Jesus (sannolikt) inte funnits (Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths?). Av vad jag hittills läst i form av utdrag och citat kommer denna bok kanske till och med att övertrumfa Ehrmans försök. Richard Carrier verkar i varje fall regera på ett likartat sätt som mitt när han skriver om sitt arbete med att recensera Caseys bok: ”Och denna förfärliga bok gör mig tyvärr galen. Jag står inte ut med den tröttsamma gräsliga inre monologen längre. Jag måste lägga ifrån mig den och göra andra saker för en stund.” http://freethoughtblogs.com/carrier/archives/5200

jesus-outside-the-new-testamentMen nu tänkte jag beröra en annan bok, en bok av ett annat slag och där problemet är ett annat. Jag har läst merparten av Robert E. Van Voorsts bok Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000). Detta är en “klassiker” inom sitt område och en bok som anses vara ett “måste” att läsa om man vill fördjupa sig i de utomkristna och framför allt utombibliska källorna som på olika sätt hänvisar till Jesus. Det är alltså en bok som många hänvisar till och som därför ingår i mångas litteraturlista.

Jag fann dock boken rätt ointressant. Den utgör visserligen en sammanfattning av forskningsläget och stundom också en ”god” sådan, men alltför ofta är den alldeles för ytlig och inte sällan oinsatt och ibland rent felaktig för att den ska vara till någon hjälp för den som vill fördjupa sig i problematiken. Med andra ord kan den fungera för den som vill stifta bekantskap med materialet och också utgöra ett underlag man kan citera för att klargöra forskningsläget, men inte mycket därutöver.

Inom logiken talar man om argument som är non sequitur. Uttrycket non sequitur är latin och betyder ”det följer inte”. Då avser man att den slutsats man drar inte följer av de argument man anför till stöd därför. Slutsatsen kan visserligen (eller kan inte) vara riktig. Däremot leder de argument man åberopar inte till den slutsatsen. Omvänt kan man säga att argumenten visserligen kan vara goda argument (eller så inte) men inte för den tes man driver.

Låt oss därför beskåda ett typiskt exempel på detta. Exemplet är hämtat från sidan 211 i Van Voorsts bok.

Morton Smith, followed by Crossan, Koester, and others, has argued that the Secret Gospel of Mark was a source of canonical Mark’s narrative. This position, though, is untenable.

Att Hemliga Markusevangeliet skulle vara källan till Markusevangeliet är enligt Van Voorst ohållbart. Han åberopar fyra argument till stöd för sitt påstående att ståndpunkten är ohållbar.

First, despite the modern consensus, the possibility that the letter is a modern forgery from the eighteenth century has not been completely excluded.

Men detta är ett argument till stöd för något annat, exempelvis att Hemliga Markusevangeliet aldrig har existerat. Det är dock inte argument till stöd för att Hemliga Markus, om det har funnits, inte var källan till Markus.

Second, Clement is often unreliable in his use of sources, and so even if his letter is authentic, this does not mean that what he says about the Secret Gospel of Mark is correct.

Här vet Van Voorst uppenbarligen inte vad Klemens säger i brevet. Klemens säger nämligen att Hemliga Markus tvärtom är en utökning av Markusevangeliet och därför precis det motsatta som det Van Voorst verkar förutsätta. Enligt Klemens var Markusevangeliet källan till Hemliga Markus. Om Klemens är att betrakta som otillförlitlig och alltså kan misstänkas ha fel, så skulle Hemliga Markus verkligen kunna vara källan till Markusevangeliet.

Jag gissar att om Van Voorst hade känt till vad som står i brevet hade han använt argumentet på motsatt sätt. Ty det går ju lika bra att säga att Klemens faktiskt motsäger att Hemliga Markus skulle vara källan till Markusevangeliet och att man därför bör tro på det Klemens säger. Och man ska vara ytterst försiktig med att fästa tilltro till argument som går att använda på motsatta sätt eftersom man då kan ge sig den på att det då också kommer att användas på just det sätt som stöder den eller den forskarens (förutfattade) åsikt.

Third, what we have of this document is highly fragmentary.

Det är givetvis sant att det vi har bevarat av Hemliga Markus blott är brottstycken. Men notera att det inte är något argument emot att Hemliga Markusevangeliet är källan till Markusevangeliet. Koester, Crossan och andra (inklusive den som skriver detta) har på grundval av det som finns bevarat dragit slutsatsen att det rimliga är att Hemliga Markus var källan till Markus. Att vi blott har fragment bevarade av Hemliga Markus är olyckligt och gör det givetvis svårare att avgöra vilket evangelium av de båda som skrevs först, men detta faktum utgör inget som helst argument till stöd för att det är ohållbart att tro att Hemliga Markus skrevs före Markusevangeliet. Eftersom endast brottstycken är bevarade är detta rimligen till lika stor nackdel för dem som argumenterar för att Markusevangeliet skrevs före Hemliga Markus som tvärtom.

Fourth, no consensus exists among those who see this document as a source of Mark.

van_voorstFörst måste man fråga sig vad Van Voorst menar med att ingen konsensus finns bland dem som anser att Hemliga Markus är källan till Markusevangeliet. Det finns ju verkligen konsensus bland dem att Hemliga Markus är källan, så det kan rimligen inte vara det Van Voorst avser. Alltså bör han avse att de teorier som följer av att man anser det vara en källa varierar mellan forskarna. Och så är också fallet. Koester har exempelvis skapat en rätt omständlig teori om olika stadier i evangeliernas utveckling. Men återigen, det faktum att man utifrån insikten att Hemliga Markus sannolikt är källan till Markusevangeliet skapar olika tänkbara scenarier kring evangeliernas tillkomst är ju inget argument emot att Hemliga Markus är källan till Markusevangeliet. I så fall kan man avfärda hela idén med synoptikernas beroende av varandra med argumentet att ingen konsensus föreligger bland forskarna rörande det synoptiska problemet.

Jag har citerat Van Voorst ordagrant och utan att utelämna något. Allt det jag här citerat har följt direkt på varann. Så även det Van Voorst skriver direkt efter att ha räknat upp de fyra argumenten.

Therefore, it is highly unlikely that the Secret Gospel of Mark, if it existed at all, was a source of canonical Mark.

Så, eftersom det inte går att utesluta att brevet vari brottstyckena ur Hemliga Markus citeras är en 1700-talsförfalskning, eftersom Klemens är opålitlig när han påstår att Markusevangeliet är källan till Hemliga Markus, eftersom vi bara har brottstycken bevarade av evangeliet och eftersom de som anser att Hemliga Markus är källan till Markusevangeliet inte är eniga, är det ytterst osannolikt, ja rent av en ohållbar ståndpunkt, att Hemliga Markusevangeliet är källan till Markusevangeliet.

Man kan givetvis anse det vara osannolikt att Hemliga Markusevangeliet är Markusevangeliets källa. Scott Brown argumenterar exempelvis för detta men då självfallet inte med hjälp av argument på denna nivå. Inget enda av de fyra argument Van Voorst åberopar stöder hans påstående trots att han använder ord som ”highly unlikely” (ytterst osannolikt) och ”unteanable” (ohållbart).

Roger Viklund, 2014-03-02

Stephen Carlson’s Questionable Questioned Document Examination

I have (with permission) uploaded Scott G. Brown’s and Allan J. Pantuck’s 2010 article, “Stephen Carlson’s Questionable Questioned Document Examination”. The pdf-file has disappeared from the Internet and was not accessible anywhere else.

The HTML-text is available though on Timo S, Paananen’s blog at http://salainenevankelista.blogspot.se/2010/04/stephen-carlsons-questionable.html

The address to the pdf-file is http://rogerviklund.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/brown-pantuck-2010.pdf

Uttrycket ”vis man” i Testimonium Flavianum

Jag har de senaste månaderna, i den mån jag alls haft tid, sysselsatt mig med att bearbeta och utöka den engelska versionen av min artikel om Jesus hos Josefus (The Jesus Passages in Josephus). Den är nu så omfångsrik att den i sig skulle kunna ges ut som bok. Framför allt har jag arbetat med språket i Testimonium Flavianum (TF) och då främst frågan om det speglas bäst i Josefus’ eller Eusebios’ språkbruk och mer explicit Alice Whealey kontra Ken Olson. Fastän jag arbetar på engelska väljer jag att skriva detta inlägg på svenska för att bättre kunna ”tänka klart”, vilket som regel går lättare på ens modersmål.

Jag ska här ta upp frågan om inledningen på TF verkligen är så mycket mer typisk för Josefus än för Eusebios. Inledningen lyder:

Vid denna tid framträder Jesus, en vis man,
(Γίνεται δὲ κατὰ τοῦτον τὸν χρόνον Ἰησοῦς σοφὸς ἀνήρ,)

Γίνεται δὲ – och uppstår
κατὰ τοῦτον τὸν χρόνον – vid denna tid
Ἰησοῦς, σοφὸς ἀνήρ, – Jesus, en vis man

Det som främst brukar hävdas är att uttrycket ”vis man” (σοφὸς ἀνήρ, eller transkriberat sofos anêr) är typiskt för Josefus. Dessutom hävdas att Eusebios (eller någon annan kristen) inte skulle nöja sig med att kalla Jesus för vis utan skulle ha gett honom ett mer upphöjt epitet, som guds son eller liknande. Fortsättningen på meningen (Vid denna tid framträder Jesus, en vis man) lyder ”om man alls skall kalla honom en man”, och den delen brukar anses vara ett kristet tillägg där någon försökt modifiera den mer modesta benämningen av Jesus som blott vis till att vara förmer än en människa, alltså en gud. Men här kan konstateras att Eusebios faktiskt på andra ställen påstår att Jesus var en vis man men därutöver också gudomlig (Mot Hierokles 5). Därmed gör han samma distinktion som den som förekommer i TF och enbart därför borde man inte kunna hävda att en kristen (som Eusebios) inte skulle ha kunnat skriva TF.

Gammalgrekiska fungerar i många stycken på helt andra sätt än modern svenska. Exempelvis böjs orden på ett långt mer sofistikerat sätt. En finess i grekiskan är exempelvis att adjektiv (och andra ord) i sig alltid innehåller genus och numerus och annat. Det betyder att ett ord som sofos (som betyder vis, kunnig och litet annat) står i singularis maskulinum och man vet redan där att det rör sig om ”en man” som är vis. Hade det varit en kvinna hade det stått sofê. Detta innebär att man om man ville lika gärna kunde skriva sofos som sofos anêr. I båda fallen betyder det en vis man. Och givetvis använder såväl Josefus som Eusebios båda uttrycken. Men när Ken Olson hävdar att Eusebios ofta använder uttrycket vis man, exempelvis talar om de hebreiska profeterna (Contra Hieroclem 4) och de grekiska filosoferna (Dem. evang. 3.5, §114) som visa, underkänner Alice Whealey hans resonemang med motiveringen att Eusebios ofta bara skriver sofos medan det i TF står sofos anêr. Detta senare skulle därför enligt henne och andra vara mer typiskt för Josefus. Som sagt både Josefus och Eusebios använder relativt ofta uttrycket ”vis man”. Dock är det vanligare hos Eusebios än hos Josefus. Jag har nämligen sökt i Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, en textsamling som innehåller merparten av den bevarade samlade antika grekiska textmassan. Men, säger Whealey, Eusebios föredrar att skriva sofos utan extratillägget av anêr (man).

Hur förhåller det sig då egentligen? Jo, Josefus använder ” sofos anêr” vid endast två tillfällen, i beskrivningarna av kung Salomo, “andri sophô kai pasan aretên echonti” (ἀνδρὶ σοφῷ καὶ πᾶσαν ἀρετὴν ἔχοντι = en vis man som äger alla dygder) i Antiquities 8:53 och om profeten Daniel som sägs vara en “sophos anêr kai deinos heurein ta amêchana” (σοφὸς ἀνὴρ καὶ δεινὸς εὑρεῖν τὰ ἀμήχανα = en vis man och skicklig på att upptäcka saker bortom mänsklig förmåga) i Antiquities 10:237.  Orsaken till att man vill hävda att sofos anêr är typiskt för Josefus är att han i andra fall kopplar detta anêr (man) till andra dygder än just visdom, exempelvis ”goda män” och ”rättfärdiga män”. Faktum kvarstår dock att just uttrycket” vis man” med både sofos och anêr förekommer hos Josefus vid endast två tillfällen vad jag kan finna. Jag har då givetvis inte räknat med TF eftersom ju den passagen är den som ska prövas. Jag utesluter på samma sätt TF de två gånger som det förekommer hos Eusebios på grekiska.

Hur förhåller det sig då med Eusebios? Ja han skriver följande i Praeparatio evangelica 7:13:7: ”καὶ Ἀριστόβουλος δὲ ἄλλος Ἑβραίων σοφὸς ἀνήρ”, vilket torde kunna översättas med ”och andra visa judiska män utöver Aristoboulos” (jag är osäker på vilken judisk kung som avses). Som synes kan också Eusebios använda sofos anêr (σοφὸς ἀνήρ). Eusebios använder uttrycket också i sina kommentarer till Psaltarens psalmer (PG 23.680, ”οὐ σοφὸς ἀνὴρ”). Dessutom använder han det om Jesus. I Eclogae propheticae (PG 22, 1129) låter Eusebios likställa Jesus (som han kallar “vår Frälsare och Herre”) med den fattige vise mannen i Predikaren 9:15 och låter därmed benämna också Jesus “sofos anêr”. Han skriver “ὁ πένης καὶ σοφὸς ἀνὴρ, ὁ Σωτὴρ καὶ Κύριος ἡμῶν”.

Nu underkänner Whealey också denna passage, något som är rätt genomgående i hennes analys. Hon sätter upp tillsynes godtyckliga definitioner och kriterier så att det i varje fall ska framstå som mer troligt att Josefus skrivit texten är att Eusebios gjort det. I detta fall påpekar hon att eftersom Eusebios bygger på den grekiska texten i Septuaginta och eftersom det där står sofos anêr, har Eusebios låtit sig påverkas av denna text och att det därför inte heller är typiskt för honom. Med godtyckliga definitioner avser jag att Whealey inte är konsekvent. Beakta exempelvis detta:

“The use of πρῶτοι ἅνδρες to mean “leading men” in Josephus’ works is very common. The sole example of πρῶτοι ἅνδρες found in Eusebius’ works (d. e. I 10,1) means chronologically earliest men rather than leading men.” (Alice Whealey, Josephus, Eusebius of Caesarea and the Testimonium Flavianum, p. 92, in Böttrich & Herzer, Eds., Josephus und das Neue Testament, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2007)

I en annan passage i TF omtalas de ”främsta männen” bland judarna och Whealey hävdar att Josefus använder uttrycket mycket ofta medan det bara förekommer en gång hos Eusebios och då i en annan betydelse. Fast när jag söker genom databasen på Josefus finner jag visserligen beteckningen ”de ledande/främsta männen” vid många tillfällen, men i nästan samtliga fall med endast protôi eller proton, således bara främsta, och ”påhänget” man eller män saknas. Det är samma uttryckssätt som Eusebios använde om ”vis man” och som Whealey då underkände som parallell. Hela uttrycket ”prôtoi andres” förekommer vad jag kan se endast tre gånger hos Josefus (Ant. 4:140, 17:81, 18:99) och då dessutom i annan betydelse vid ett av dessa tillfällen. Det skulle i så fall betyda att om man tillämpade Whealeys standard vad gäller ”vis man” skulle Josefus använda uttrycket ”prôtoi andres” med samma betydelse som i TF vid två tillfällen och Eusebios vid inget. Jämför detta med det Whealey skriver, nämligen att ”prôtoi andres i betydelsen ’främsta männen’ är mycket vanligt hos Josefus.”

För att återgå till detta med ”vis man”. Josefus använder samma uttryck som förekommer i TF vid två tillfällen. Eusebios använder det vid tre, i kommentaren till Psaltarens psalm 100, om den judiske konungen Aristoboulos och om Jesus under täckmanteln ”vår Frälsare och Herre”. Oavsett om man nu antar att Eusebios är påverkad av annat eller ej, så kvarstår faktum 1), att han använder uttrycket oftare än Josefus, 2) att han använder det om Jesus och 3) att han heller inte tvekar att kalla Jesus vis, vare sig han som i detta fall använder det fulla uttrycket ”sofos anêr” eller som han gör annorstädes, bara kallar honom ”sofos”.

Jag har svårt att se hur man därmed kan säga att uttrycket ”vis man” skulle vara mer typiskt för Josefus än för Eusebios. Och då är att betänka att just detta exempel är det som kanske oftast framförs när man vill hävda att det finns partier i TF som definitivt bättre återspeglar Josefus’ språkbruk än Eusebios’.

Roger Viklund, 2013-12-26

Foton från Louvren 3 – Baal

800px-Louvre_2007_02_24_c

Gamla Testamentets profeter angriper Baal, Ashera och andra gudar på nästan varje sida i profetböckerna. Orsaken är givetvis att Israels folk dyrkade dessa gudar tillsammans med och ibland i stället för JHVH. Detta var för övrigt Morton Smiths tes i hans andra doktorsavhandling, nämligen att majoriteten bland de gamla israeliterna dyrkade flera gudar och att monoteismen kom till makten relativt sent.

Bibeln säger att israeliterna under domartiden (ca 1200–1000 fvt) dyrkade Baal och JHVH. Vissa israeliter bar Baals namn. Israeliternas förste konung Saul gav ett av sina barn namnet Eshbaal efter guden Baal (1 Krön 8:33). Hosea uppger att JHVH också kallades Baal (Hos 2:16). Av 15 sammansatta namn som hittats i nordriket Israel innehöll visserligen nio Jahve eller JHVH men hela sex innehöll Baal, vilket kan tyda på att i norr var Baal nästan lika populär som JHVH. (William G. Dever, What Did The Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It?, s. 210)

Baal är en gud som är nära förknippad med vädret. Han är framför allt en storm- och regngud. Det är därför en aning märkligt att han, i likhet med Jesus, också är en döende och från de döda uppstående gud, då sådana gudar brukar vara vegetationsgudar. Men Baal ansågs frambringa regn, och avsaknad av regn innebär torka och växtlighetens död. Baals död är därför den yttersta orsaken till torkans början, en torka som sägs ha varat i sju eller åtta år. Detta kan jämföras med den sjuåriga torka som omtalas i samband med Josefs vistelse hos farao i Egypten.

Enligt fynd gjorda i bland annat den uråldriga staden Ugarit och stammande från 1300- och 1200-talen fvt, utspann sig en strid mellan Baal och dödsguden Mot. Lertavlorna inunder, vilka jag fotograferade i Louvren, innehåller alla den berättelse som brukar betecknas Baals cykel, med död, uppståndelse och liv på nytt i enlighet med årstidernas skiftningar.

baalcykel3

Denna lertavla med kilskrift kommer från staden Ugarit vid den nordsyriska kusten; ett utgrävningsområde som benämns Ras Shamra eller Tell Ras esh-Shamra, där ”tell” avser en kulle som byggts upp genom århundraden av avlagringar från tidigare bosättningar. Tavlan stammar från 1300- eller 1200-talet eller kanske till och med litet tidigare. I tavlan omnämns El, som väl rimligen är densamme som den El som är det ena av två gudsnamnen i Bibeln, där JHVH är det andra. Även JHVH förekommer sannolikt i Ugarit under namnet JV. Vidare berättas om striden mellan Baal och Mot och Baals seger över Mot (döden).

Inunder finns en bild från utgrävningarna av Ugarit.

Ugarit_01

baalcykel1

I denna kilskriftstavla från 1300- eller 1200-talet fvt, också från Ugarit, berättas om Baals konfrontation med flodguden Jam. Jam  är en gud av kaos och död i motsats till många andra, icke-fientliga gudar. Han sägs i de ugaritiska källorna vara Els son, alltså Guds son. Jam som betyder hav är havets och flodernas gud. Han ligger i fejd med Baal, och han utnämns av El till kung. El berättar för de andra gudarna att Jam tidigare kallades för Jav: ”Min sons namn är Jav”. Jams ursprungliga namn var alltså Jav (eller Javu) men El säger att han hädanefter ska kallas ”Els älskade” och sänder honom att avsätta Baal. Baal slår ner Jam eller Jav, vilken dödas i striden. (”SM. BNY. JV”. CTA 1 IV 14. Se The Archaeological Evidence of the Exodus from Egypt, s. 20–23.)

Vi kan se El och Jav/Jam som tidiga prototyper för israeliternas gudar El och JHVH.

Jag vet inte hur mycket av denna berättelse som återfinns på just denna övre tavla. Som ju tydligt framgår är det blott ett brottstycke av en ursprungligen större tavla. Men tavlorna är som regel mycket små – förvånansvärt små. De tre som jag återger här och som skildrar Baals cykel är ungefär stora som en hand, medan många andra kompletta tavlor inte är så värst mycket större än kreditkort.

baalcykel2

Också denna sista kilskriftstavla kommer från utgrävningarna i Ras Shamra, Ugarit. Den dateras till 1300-talet fvt (1399–1300 fvt) och är alltså drygt 3300 år gammal. Även här skildras fruktbarhetsguden Baals strid mot dödsguden Mot – torkan.

I The Riddle of Resurrection på sidorna 55–81 sammanfattar Tryggve N. D. Mettinger berättelsen om Baals cykel, vilken han uppger återfinns på tavlorna 1.4VII:42 till 1.6.VI. Min sammanfattning av hans sammanfattning lyder som följer:

Baal bygger ett palats och tillkännager för världen att han inte längre böjer sig för döden, det vill säga Mot, vilken han förvisar till endast öknarna. Baal sänder två budbärare till Mot. De ska gå ner till frihetshuset och därigenom räknas bland de döda. Budbärarna återvänder till Baal med en inbjudan från Mot att nedstiga till underjorden, ta med sig sina moln, vindar, blixtar och sitt regn och smaka på Mots mat bestående av lera. Baal kan inte värja sig mot denna kallelse att nedstiga till dödsriket och beslutar sig därför att skaffa sig avkomma genom att para sig med en kviga.

Här kan det vara lämpligt att inflika att även JHVH förefaller ha avbildats tillsammans med och kanske som en oxe/tjur.

Gudinnan Ashera ansågs i den ugaritiska mytologin vara Els maka och mor till Baal. I Bibeln finns hänvisningar till att man i vissa kretsar betraktat henne som Baals hustru (2 Kung 23:4). Och inskriptioner visar att man betraktade henne också som JHVHs maka. Inskriptionerna härrör från 700-talet fvt och är funna på krukskärvor dels i Kuntillet ‘Ajrûd, en ruin i norra Sinai, dels i Khirbet el-Qôm i Judeen.

Inskriptionerna talar om JHVH och hans Ashera. Nedan ses en teckning av en krukskärva från just Kuntillet ‘Ajrûd.

kuntillet

Stående ses två gudar där den högra har bröst och den rimliga tolkningen är att de representerar JHVH och ”hans” Ashera. Deras svansar och huvuden tyder på att de är kalvar. Inskriptionen säger: ”Jag välsignar dig genom JHVH från Samarien och genom hans Ashera.” Detta visar att Jaho hade en följeslagerska, troligen att betrakta som en modergudinna, och att folket vid denna tid inte var monoteister.

För att återgå till berättelsen om Baal, där denne parat sig med en kviga, saknas därefter ca fyrtio rader av berättelsen, och vi vet inte riktigt vad som händer. När vi på nytt kommer in i berättelsen, får vi veta att man meddelar El att Baal är död och El och modergudinnan Anat (som kallades jungfrun och i Elefantine kallades hon ”JHVHs Anat”) sörjer honom.

Tillsammans med den ugaritiska solgudinnan Shapash ger sig Anat ut och letar efter Baal, och vid världens ände finner de hans döda kropp. De tar kroppen till berget Sapan, förrättar ett offer och begraver Baal. Anat meddelar El att Baal verkligen är död, och tillsammans resonerar de om vem som ska kunna ersätta honom. Men den person de utser klarar inte av uppgiften. Då beslutar Anat att uppsöka Mot (döden) för att försöka återfå Baal. När Anat ber Mot att frige Baal, berättar Mot hur han svalde Baal. Anat klyver då Mot med ett svärd, varefter hon sållar bitarna, eldar honom, mal honom på en kvarnsten för att slutligen sprida ut honom på en åker.

Under tiden drömmer El att höstregnet återkommer och med det växtligheten. Detta är för El det avgörande beviset på att Baal har återvänt till livet. Solgudinnan Shapash söker efter Baal, och vi får senare veta att Baal har återvänt till sin tron, till ett fullt aktivt liv. Striden mellan Baal och Mot fortsätter till dess Mot kapitulerar och Baal slutligen upphöjs på sin kungatron.

Vad vi ser här är en fullständig vegetationscykel, från liv till död och åter till livet – just så som Jesus sägs ha fötts, dött och därefter uppstått från de döda.

Roger Viklund, 2013-08-24

Foton från Louvren 2

louvren2

Här är fler foton som jag tog vid mitt besök på Louvren i mars 2012. Ett av de absolut mest berömda föremålen där, är den imponerande Hammurabis lagsamling. Denna lagsamling finns bevarad på flera tavlor, men den mest berömda är otvivelaktigt denna flera meter höga stele gjord av diorit.

hammurabi1

Hammurabi var kung av Babylon, troligen 1792–1750 fvt. På denna stele har han inristat 282 lagparagrafer (där 247 ännu är bevarade). Hela statyn runt om är täckt av fina tecken. Dessa lagar förespråkar bland annat straff som svarar mot brottet; det vill säga ett öga för ett öga och en tand för en tand. Motivet överst föreställer Hammurabi inför solguden Shamash.

gudea

Även denna staty är gjord av diorit.

Den ska föreställa kung Gudea av Lagash och statyn, liksom Gudeas levnad, dateras till  tjugohundratalet fvt. Lagash låg i nuvarande Irak som på den tiden svarade mot tvåflodslandet Mesopotamien och då dess södra del, kallad Sumer. Som  framgår av bilden fanns där ett rätt stort antal statyer av Gudea; vissa mer skadade än andra.

Bilden inunder visar den rätt så stora ”Lercylinder A” som påträffades vid templet Eninnu och som tillägnas Ningirsu

LercylinderA

På denna lercylinder finns också bevarat en bön som kung Gudea tillägnar gudinnan Gatumdug (raderna 64–67); vari han säger följande:

”För mig som inte har någon [mänsklig] moder är du min moder. För mig som inte har någon [mänsklig] fader är du min fader. Min faders säd tog du emot i ditt moderliv, du födde mig i helgedomen; Gatumdug, ditt heliga namn är ljuvligt.”

Här kan man jämföra med en vers ur Psaltarens 2:a psalm, som handlar om Sions konung:

”Jag vill berätta vad Herren [JHVH] bestämt. Han sade till mig: ‘Du är min son, jag har fött dig i dag …’” (Ps 2:7)

martyr

Detta är en så kallad martyrtavla stammande från Kherbet Oum el Ahdam i Algeriet och daterad till slutet av 300-talet. Den lätt obegripliga texten lyder ungefär som följer:

Heligt minnesmärke. Del av jordens löfte, där Kristus föddes, till Petrus och Paulus. Martyrernas namn var Datianus, Donatianus, Cyprianus, Nemesianus, Citinus och Victoria. I det provinsiella året 320. Benatus och Pequaria reste denna. Victorinus, Miggin – 7 september, och Dabula och en del av träet från korset.

Jag kommer onekligen att tänka på Bart Ehrman som försvarade det faktum att Jesus inte finns omnämnd i någon enda någorlunda samtida uppteckning, inskription eller på annat sätt med ungefär att ingen annan heller nämndes. När då Carrier utmanande honom på den punkten försvarade han sig med att inga ”vanliga” människor omnämndes. Men det var just precis vad de gjorde. Här är ett exempel bland många, om än det i detta fall råkar vara 300 år för sent för att utgöra en samtida parallell.

Roger Viklund, 2013-08-20

Foton från Louvren

Louvren_grand

Jag tog ett antal foton på vissa föremål i Louvren när jag var där i mars 2012, och tänkte lägga upp några av bilderna här på bloggen. Det är rätt svårt att få bra foton då man inte får använda blixt och det är rätt så dunkelt i palatset. Dessutom befinner sig många av föremålen bakom glas, så det går ändå inte att använda blixt på grund av den reflektion som då uppstår mot glaset. Jag har till yttermera visso skalat ner bilderna till mer lämplig storlek och sparat dem i halvhög upplösning för att de inte ska bli för stora.

Artemis_Diana

Detta föreställer den jagande grekiska gudinnan Artemis eller den romerska Diana. Statyn antas stamma från 100-talet.

Baal

Detta föreställer den västsemitiske fruktbarhetsguden Baal, stormens, åskans och blixtens gud. Han är himmelens och jordens herre; den mäktigaste krigaren. Hans palats ligger på toppen av ett berg och hans röst är som åskan. Baal var den mest dyrkade guden i Kanaan. Eftersom namnet Baal är en titel (betyder ”Herre”), var han känd under många namn men med Baal som förled, exempelvis hette han Baal-Hadad i Babylonien.

CoptLuk

En koptisk tiohundratalstext som innehåller Lukas 7:12b–22b.

Marsyas2

Detta föreställer Marsyas från Frygien, en av de ”korsfästa gudarna”; vilken alltså avbildades upphängd på en påle. Den franska bildtexten (jag kan egentligen inte franska) förefaller säga att statyn är från något av de två första århundradena. Inunder finns en bild av en relief som bara fanns på en liten bild bredvid bildtexten och som också föreställer Marsyas.

Marsyas_Basrelief

Detta är den så kallade Meshastelen.

Mesastelen

Enligt Meshastelen utkämpades en strid mellan Israel och Moab. Israel leddes av Omri och Achav. Detta slag finns återgivet även i Bibeln, närmare bestämt i Andra Kungaboken 3ff. Men där anges att det var Achav och hans son Joram (851–845 fvt) som stred.

Mithras1

En av många stentavlor som skildras Mithras’ liv och gärning. Just denna marmortavla uppges vara från 100- eller 200-talet och det står på anslaget att den är dubbelsidig (Relief mithriaque à double face). Jag måste ha missat baksidan.

Roger Viklund, 2013-08-19

Biografi över Morton Smith

Jag har skrivit en Wikipedia-artikel om Morton Smith, kontroversiell upptäckare av Klemensbrevet innehållande utdrag ur Hemliga Markusevangeliet. För något år sedan skrev jag en helt ny artikel om Hemliga Markusevangeliet på Wikipedia emedan den då existerande var undermålig. Den tidigare artikeln om Morton Smith var mycket kort och lätt tendentiös och jag bestämde mig därför att göra ett försök att åstadkomma en mer fullständig och mer balanserad artikel. Jag förmodar att eftersom jag (åtminstone i skrivande stund) har skrivit alltsammans i artikeln också har rätten att publicera densamma på min blogg.

Förhoppningsvis kan artikeln förbättras ytterligare. Vi får dock hoppas att den får vara skonad från redigeringskrig iscensatt av religiösa motiv.

MORTON SMITH

Robert Morton Smith, född 28 maj 1915, död 11 juli 1991,[1] var professor i antikens historia vid Columbia University i staden New York.[2]

Smith var en framstående kännare av antikens historia med inriktning på judendomen, kristendomen och mysteriekulter.[3] Han är måhända dock mest känd för att ha påträffat ett brev i munkklostret Mar Saba i Israel 1958. Brevet, som uppges vara skrivet av Klemens av Alexandria, innehåller två utdrag ur det så kallade Hemliga Markusevangeliet.

Biografi

Morton Smith föddes i Philadelfia, Pennsylvania i USA, den 28 maj 1915. År 1936 tog han kandidatexamen (B.A.) med engelska som huvudämne vid Harvard University i Cambridge, Massachusetts. Hans fortsatta studier bedrevs vid Harvard Divinity School (del av Harvard University) där han studerade Nya testamentet, judendomen och grekisk-romersk religion och avlade en teologie kandidatexamen (Bachelor of Sacred Theology) år 1940.

Smith, som också studerat rabbinsk hebreiska, erhöll ett stipendium som möjliggjorde att han kunde resa till Jerusalem för att studera vid Hebreiska universitetet 1940–1942. Efter studierna kunde han emellertid inte lämna området på grund av USA:s inträde i Andra världskriget och använde därför tiden fram till 1945 till att doktorera som filosofie doktor med en avhandling skriven på hebreiska[4] [5] och blev därigenom den förste icke-juden att lyckas med den bedriften.[6] Han fick sin avhandling godkänd 1948.[7] I denna, som utkom i engelsk översättning 1951 som Tannaitic Parallels to the Gospels, lyfte Smith fram paralleller och likheter mellan evangelierna och den tidiga rabbinska litteraturen[8] (Tannaim: de rabbinska lärde vars uttalanden finns bevarade i mishna, den äldsta delen av talmud).

Smith återvände till Harvard Divinity School för att doktorera en andra gång, nu som Teologie doktor (1957), med en avhandling som först 1971 utkom i tryck: Palestinian Parties and Politics That Shaped the Old Testament.[9] Här argumenterar han för att det i det gamla Israel funnits två rivaliserande riktningar där synen på Jahve, som inte bara den högste utan den ende guden, var i minoritetsställning; en falang som ändå lyckades erövra makten genom att knyta exempelvis kung Josia till sin uppfattning.[10]

Mellan åren 1950 och 1955 undervisade han på Brown University i Rhode Island som assisterande professor. Därefter tjänstgjorde han ett år som gästprofessor i religionshistoria vid Drew University i Madison, New Jersey, varpå han 1957 utnämndes till professor i antikens historia vid Columbia University i staden New York. Han upprätthöll den tjänsten fram till sin pensionering som professor emeritus 1985, men fortsatte att undervisa nästan ända till sin död i akut hjärtsvikt vid 76 års ålder 1991.[11]

Gärning

Smith prästvigdes 1946 i Episkopalkyrkan i USA och verkade också som präst under åren 1946–1950.[12] Efter detta innehade han inga tjänster inom Episkopalkyrkan, men kvarstod ändå under hela sitt liv i dess prästregister.[13]

Smith ägnade åtskillig tid åt att spåra upp gamla handskrifter. Hans intresse väcktes i slutet av 1940-talet då han under sina doktorandstudier[14] kom att undersöka handskriftsläget rörande den asketiske 400-talsabboten Isidoros av Pelusium. Smith erhöll senare ett stipendium som möjliggjorde för honom att söka ett års tjänstledighet från Brown University och resa runt i Grekland för att fotografera handskrifter av och om just Isidoros. Under 1951 och 1952 besökte Smith kloster, privata och offentliga bibliotek, och lyckades så småningom fotografera alla betydande Isidoros-handskrifter i Västeuropa. Utöver detta lät Smith beskriva, fotografera och katalogisera många andra dittills okatalogiserade handskriftssamlingar.[15]

Smith företog åtminstone två ytterligare resor i syfte att leta efter handskrifter. Han tillbringade flera månader under sommaren 1958 i Turkiet och Palestina (då han bland annat fann Klemensbrevet), och han reste till Syrien 1966 på jakt efter hebreiska handskrifter.[16]

Morton Smith var känd som en mycket hängiven och skarpsinnig forskare som lade stor vikt vid detaljer och fakta. Därtill var han en ofta skoningslös kritiker av sina kolleger, framför allt när han ansåg deras arbeten vara bristfälliga.[17]Hans bidrag spänner över många forskningsfält, däribland den grekiska och romerska antikens litteratur, Nya testamentet, patristiken och judendomen under såväl andra tempelperioden som den senare talmudiska tiden.[18]

Klemensbrevet och Hemliga Markusevangeliet

Det var i samband med en vistelse på munkklostret Mar Saba sommaren 1958 som Smith fann ett tillsynes i hast nedskrivet brev på tre tidigare tomma sidor i en tryckt bok från 1646.[19] Smith hade redan i början av 1942 besökt klostret och då provat på klosterlivet i nästan två månader,[20][21] och hade nu 16 år senare som en ynnest för sitt långvariga ideella engagemang med att samla in pengar till det grekisk-ortodoxa patriarkatet i Jerusalem givits tillåtelse att under tre veckors tid undersöka klosterbiblioteket.[22][23] Eftersom de flesta värdefulla böcker hade förflyttats till patriarkatets bibliotek i Jerusalem, koncentrerade sig Smith i första hand på att finna sällsynta texter i inbindningarna av nyare böcker, vilka ibland bundits om med material från äldre kasserade handskrifter.[24] Mot slutet av sin vistelse fann han så en grekisk text skriven i vad som föreföll vara en 1700-talshandstil. Smith fotograferade sidorna och lämnade boken kvar.[25]

Redan i december samma år lät Smith lämna in sin egen transkription av brevet med en preliminär engelsk översättning till Library of Congress,[26] för att tillförsäkra sig upphovsrätten och därmed kunna dela upptäckten med andra forskare utan att riskera att bli bestulen på den.[27] Vid ett möte på Society of Biblical Literature år 1960 lät Smith offentliggöra sitt fynd, men det dröjde till 1973 innan han utkom med sin mångåriga och grundliga studie av brevet i Clement of Alexandria and a Secret Gospel of Mark. Att det dröjde så länge (15 år efter upptäckten) hängde samman med att Smith uppenbarligen förväntade sig att forskaretablissemanget skulle vara motvilligt att acceptera den nya skriften, och han ägnade därför många år åt grundliga studier för att försöka autentisera texten.[28] Dessutom var Smith i huvudsak klar med boken redan 1966, men det tog ytterligare sju år i produktionsledet innan boken kunde tryckas.[29]

Kritik mot Smiths teorier

Genom att brevets äkthet redan tidigt blev ifrågasatt, kom misstankar om manipulering att riktas mot Smith själv, emedan den ende som rimligen skulle ha haft möjlighet att förfalska brevet var dess upptäckare.[30]

Saken förstärktes ytterligare genom Smiths tolkning av den längre passagen ur Hemliga Markusevangeliet som att Jesus och lärjungen med linneskynket genomgick en dopritual. Genom att bygga på många källor kom Smith till slutsatsen att Jesus lät sina närmaste lärjungar deltaga i mysterieriter där man förenades i anden, och där lärjungarna i initieringen inträdde i Guds himmelska rike (Guds rikes mysterium).[31] Även om Smith hyllades för sin grundlighet och stora lärdom, blev många upprörda över hans slutsatser om Jesus som en libertinistisk mystagog som lät hypnotisera sina lärjungar till att tro att de reste till himlen.[32] Att Smith dessutom antydde att den andliga föreningen mellan Jesus och lärjungarna möjligen också kunde ha innefattat fysisk förening var än mer frånstötande för många forskare, vilka omöjligt kunde föreställa sig att Jesus kunde framställas på det viset i en trovärdig antik kristen text.[33][34]

Efter Smiths död har anklagelserna mot honom blivit än mer uttalade.[35] Smiths egna tolkningar av brevet har dock ingen inverkan på frågan om dess äkthet. Smith reagerade kraftigt med både upprördhet och vrede gentemot alla antydningar om att han skulle ha förfalskat brevet.[36] och vidhöll sin oskuld fram till sin död.

Publikationer

Böcker:

  • Tannaitic Parallels to the Gospels (1951)
  • The Ancient Greeks (1960)
  • Heroes and Gods: Spiritual Biographies in Antiquity [i samarbete med Moses Hadas] (1965)
  • Palestinian Parties and Politics That Shaped the Old Testament (1971)
  • Clement of Alexandria and a Secret Gospel of Mark (1973)
  • The Secret Gospel; The Discovery and Interpretation of the Secret Gospel According to Mark (1973)
  • The Ancient History of Western Civilization [med Elias Bickerman] (1976).
  • Jesus the Magician: Charlatan or Son of God? (1978)
  • Hope and History (1980)
  • Studies in the Cult of Yahweh. Vol. 1. Historical Method, Ancient Israel, Ancient Judaism. Vol. 2. New Testament, Early Christianity, and Magic [redigerad av Shaye J. D. Cohen] (1996)
  • What the Bible Really Says [redigerad tillsammans med R. Joseph Hoffmann] (1992).

Artiklar i urval:

  • Notes on Goodspeed’s “Problems of the New Testament Translation”. Journal of Biblical Literature 64 (1945), 501–514.
  • Psychiatric Practice and Christian Dogma, Journal of Pastoral Care 3:1 (1949), 12–20.
  • Tannaitic Parallels to the Gospels. Journal of Biblical Literature, Monograph Series VI. ‘Society of Biblical Literature’ (1951).
  • The Common Theology of the Ancient near East, Journal of Biblical Literature 71 (1952), 135–147.
  • Minor Collections of Manuscripts in Greece, Journal of Biblical Literature 72 (1953), chap. xii.
  • The Manuscript Tradition of Isidore of Pelusium. Harvard Theological Review 47 (1954), 205–210.
  • Comments on Taylor’s Commentary on Mark, Harvard Theological Review 48 (1955), 21–64.
  • The Religious History of Classical Antiquity, Journal of Reformed Theology 12 (1955), 90–99.
  • The Jewish Elements in the Gospels, Journal of Bible and Religion, 24 (1956), 90–96.
  • Σύμμεικτα: Notes on Collections of Manuscripts in Greece. Ἐπετηρὶς Ἑταιρείας Βυζαντιῶν Σπουδῶν 26 (1956), 380–393.
  • Pauline Problems. Apropos of J. Munck, ‘Paulus und die Heilsgeschichte’, Harvard Theological Review 50 (1957) 107-131.
  • An Unpublished Life of St. Isidore of Pelusium. Eucharistherion (1958) 429–438.
  • Aramaic Studies and the Study of the New Testament, Journal of Bible and Religion 26 (1958), 304-313.
  • The Description of the Essenes in Josephus and the Philosophumena. Hebrew Union College Annual 29 (1958), 273–313.
  • The Image of God: Notes on the Hellenization of Judaism, with Especial Reference to Goodenough’s Work on Jewish Symbols, Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 40, 2 (1958), 473–512.
  • A Byzantine Panegyric Collection with an Unknown Homily for the Annunciation, Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 2, 137–155.
  • On the New Inscription from Serra Orlando, American Journal of Archaeology 63 (1959), 183f.
  • Greek Monasteries and their Manuscripts, American Journal of Archaeology 63 (1959), 190f.
  • What is Implied by the Variety of Messianic Figures, Journal of Biblical Literature 78 (1959), 66–72.
  • Monasteries and Their Manuscripts, Archaeology 13 (1960), 172–177.
  • Ἑλληνικὰ χειρόγραφα ἐν τῇ Μονῇ τοῦ ἁγίου Σάββα. Översatt till grekiska av Archimandrite K. Michaelides. Νέα Σιών 52 (1960), 110–125, 245–256.
  • New Fragments of Scholia on Sophocles’ Ajax. Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 3:1 (1960), 40–42.
  • The Dead Sea Sect in Relation to Ancient Judaism, New Testament Studies 7 (1960-1), 347–360.
  • Hebrew Studies within the Study of History, Judaism 11 (1962), 333–344.
  • The Religious Conflict in Central Europe, The Greek Orthodox Theological Review 8 (1962), 21–52.
  • Religions in the Hellenistic Age, J. Neusner (ed.), Religions in Antiquity (1966), 158–173.
  • Jesus’ Attitude Towards the Law, Fourth World Congress of Jewish Studies [1965] (1967), Papers, I, 241–244.
  • Historical Method in the Study of Religion, History and Theory, Beiheft VIII (1968), 8-16.
  • The Present State of Old Testament Studies. Journal of Biblical Literature 88 (1969), 19–35.
  • On the Problem of Method in the Study of Rabbinic Literature, Journal of Biblical Literature 92 (1973), 112 f.
  • On the Authenticity of the Mar Saba Letter of Clement. Catholic Biblical Quarterly 38:2 (1976), 196–199.
  • A Rare Sense of προκοπτω and the Authenticity of the Letter of Clement of Alexandria, God’s Christ and His People: Studies in Honour of Nils Alstrup Dahl (ed. Jacob Jervell och Wayne A. Meeks; Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1977), 261–264.
  • In Quest of Jesus. New York Review of Books 25, no. 20 (December 21, 1978).
  • Clement of Alexandria and Secret Mark: The Score at the End of the First Decade, Harvard Theological Review 75 (1982), 449–461.
  • Regarding Secret Mark: A Response by Morton Smith to the Account by Per Beskow, Journal of Biblical Literature 103 (1984), 624.

Referenser

Noter

  1. ^ Movaco, Social Security Death Index.
  2. ^ Lindsay Jones (red.) Encyclopedia of Religion, 2005.
  3. ^ John Dart, Morton Smith; ‘Secret Gospel’ Discoverer (Los Angeles Times, 20 juli 1991).
  4. ^ Lindsay Jones (red.) Encyclopedia of Religion, 2005.
  5. ^ Peter Jeffery, The Secret Gospel of Mark Unveiled: Imagined Rituals of Sex, Death, and Madness in a Biblical Forgery, Yale University Press, 2007, s. 150.
  6. ^ Joseph Aviram, Symbiosis, Symbolism, and the Power of the Past: Canaan, Ancient Israel, and Their Neighbors from the Late Bronze Age Through Roman Palaestina (2003), s. 573.
  7. ^ Morton Smith, Maqbilot ben haBesorot le Sifrut haTanna’im (Ph.D. Diss., Hebrew University, 1948).
  8. ^ Allan J, Pantuck, A question of ability: what did he know and when did he know it? Further excavations from the Morton Smith archives, s 188; i Tony Burke (ed.), Ancient Gospel or Modern Forgery? The Secret Gospel of Mark in Debate. Proceedings from the 2011 York University Christian Apocrypha Symposium’. (Cascade Books, 2013).
  9. ^ Lindsay Jones (red.) Encyclopedia of Religion, 2005.
  10. ^ Albert Pietersma, Review of Palestinian Parties and Politics That Shaped the Old Testament by Morton Smith, Journal of Biblical Literature Vol. 91, No. 4 (Dec., 1972), s. 550–552. Förhandsgranskning tillgänglig 30 juli 2013.
  11. ^ Lindsay Jones (red.) Encyclopedia of Religion, 2005.
  12. ^ Peter Jeffery, The Secret Gospel of Mark Unveiled: Imagined Rituals of Sex, Death, and Madness in a Biblical Forgery, Yale University Press, 2007, s. 150.
  13. ^ Lindsay Jones (red.) Encyclopedia of Religion, 2005.
  14. ^ Morton Smith, The Secret Gospel; The Discovery and Interpretation of the Secret Gospel According to Mark (New York: Harper and Row, 1973), s. 8.
  15. ^ Allan J. Pantuck, Response to Agamemnon Tselikas on Morton Smith and the Manuscripts from Cephalonia, Biblical Archaeology Review (Tillgänglig online 28 juli 2013).
  16. ^ Allan J. Pantuck, Solving the Mysterion of Morton Smith and the Secret Gospel of Mark, Biblical Archaeology Review (Tillgänglig online 28 juli 2013).
  17. ^ John Dart, Morton Smith; ‘Secret Gospel’ Discoverer (Los Angeles Times, 20 juli 1991).
  18. ^ Bart D. Ehrman, Lost Christianities. Oxford University Press (2003), s. 70.
  19. ^ Isaac Vossius’ första utgåva av Ignatios av Antiochias brev (Epistolae genuinae S. Ignatii martyris) publicerad i Amsterdam år 1646.
  20. ^ Morton Smith, The Secret Gospel; The Discovery and Interpretation of the Secret Gospel According to Mark (1973), s. 1, 4.
  21. ^ Stephen C. Carlson, The Gospel Hoax: Morton Smith’s Invention of Secret Mark, Waco, Texas (2005), s. 8.
  22. ^ Allan J. Pantuck; Scott G. Brown, Morton Smith as M. Madiotes: Stephen Carlson’s Attribution of Secret Mark to a Bald Swindler, Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus 6 (2008) s. 106–107.
  23. ^ Morton Smith, The Secret Gospel; The Discovery and Interpretation of the Secret Gospel According to Mark (1973), s. 9.
  24. ^ Smith skrev att han inte hade tillstånd att ta isär böckerna. Ändå var det just det han gjorde och upptäckte då bland annat nästan ett dussin blad, där flera visade sig innehålla textfragment från Makarios av Egypten; alla okända i standardutgåvorna. (Morton Smith, The Secret Gospel, s. 11–13).
  25. ^ Morton Smith, The Secret Gospel, s. 12–13).
  26. ^ Manuscript Material from the Monastery of Mar Saba: Discovered, Transcribed, and Translated by Morton Smith, New York, privately published (dec. 1958), s, i + 10.
  27. ^ Allan J. Pantuck i en kommentar på Timo S. Paananens blogg, (Tillgänglig online 28 juli 2013).
  28. ^ Guy G. Stroumsa, Gershom Scholem and Morton Smith: Correspondence, 1945-1982, Jerusalem Studies in Religion and Culture; Leiden, Brill( 2008), s. xiv.
  29. ^ Scott G. Brown, Mark’s Other Gospel: Rethinking Morton Smith’s Controversial Discovery. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, (2005), s. 6.
  30. ^ Exempelvis Quesnell, Quentin, The Mar Saba Clementine: A Question of Evidence, Catholic Biblical Quarterly 37 (1975), 48–67.
  31. ^ Smith utvecklade sina ideer om detta i framför allt Jesus the Magician: Charlatan or Son of God?, New York, Harper & Row, (1978).
  32. ^ Scott G. Brown, Mark’s Other Gospel: Rethinking Morton Smith’s Controversial Discovery. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, (2005), s. 6.
  33. ^ Guy G. Stroumsa, Gershom Scholem and Morton Smith: Correspondence, 1945-1982, Jerusalem Studies in Religion and Culture; Leiden: Brill,( 2008), s. xiv.
  34. ^ Endast vid två tillfällen i sina två böcker om Hemliga Markusevangeliet nämnde Smith i ren spekulation att Jesus och lärjungarna kan ha förenats också fysiskt i riten, men han ansåg att det väsentliga var att lärjungarna fylldes av Jesu ande: ”Freedom from the law may have resulted in completion of the spiritual union by physical union.” (Morton Smith, The Secret Gospel, s. 114). “… ‘the mystery of the kingdom of God’ . . . was a baptism administered by Jesus to chosen disciples, singly, and by night. In this baptism the disciple was united with Jesus. The union may have been physical (… there is no telling how far symbolism went in Jesus’ rite), but the essential thing was that the disciple was possessed by Jesus’ spirit.” (Morton Smith, Clement of Alexandria and a Secret Gospel of Mark, s. 251).
  35. ^ Exempelvis Stephen C. Carlson, The Gospel Hoax: Morton Smith’s Invention of Secret Mark (Waco: Baylor University Press, 2005), Peter Jeffery, The Secret Gospel of Mark Unveiled: Imagined Rituals of Sex, Death, and Madness in a Biblical Forgery (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006) och Francis Watson, Beyond Suspicion: On the Authorship of the Mar Saba Letter and the Secret Gospel of Mark, Journal of Theological Studies, NS 61 (2010), 128–170.
  36. ^ Bland annat hotade han med att stämma förläggaren av Per Beskows bok Strange tales about Jesus på en miljon dollar om boken inte drogs tillbaka. Tvisten löstes genom att Beskow omformulerade några meningar. (The Blackwell Companion to Jesus, ed. Delbert Burkett – 2011 CHAPTER 28, Per Beskow, Modern Mystifications of Jesus.)

Jobjorn Boman versus Richard Carrier on the subject of Thallus on Jesus

I intend to discuss two recent articles on the subject of Thallus on Jesus. Richard Carrier, in “Thallus and the Darkness at Christ’s Death,” Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism 8 (2011-2012), 185-91, argues that Thallus did not mention Jesus and that this is proven by Eusebius who actually quotes him. In response to Carrier’s article, Jobjorn Boman wrote “Comments on Carrier: Is Thallus Actually Quoted by Eusebius?”, which was published in Liber Annuus 62 (2012), Jerusalem 2013, pp. 319-25. Boman agrees with Carrier that Thallus did not mention Jesus at all, but reaches that conclusion from a different angle.

Having discussed this with Boman for a long time (many years actually); having evaluated Carrier’s article and proofread and commented upon Boman’s article in its coming into being, I think it is now time for me to present both views. I begin with Carrier’s article, as it was published first.

Carrier begins his article this way:

“It is commonly claimed that a chronologer named Thallus, writing shortly after 52 CE, mentioned the crucifixion of Jesus and the noontime darkness surrounding it (which reportedly eclipsed the whole world for three hours), and attempted to explain it as an ordinary solar eclipse. But this is not a credible interpretation of the evidence. A stronger case can be made that we actually have a direct quotation of what Thallus said, and it does not mention Jesus.” (185)

Boman summarizes Carrier’s argument thus:

“Richard Carrier argues, amongst other things, that Thallus was actually quoted by Eusebius of Caesarea, and thus that modern scholarship possesses the exact words of Thallus – words which do not contain any reference to Jesus Christ or Christianity.”

Thallus’ work is lost, and so is our knowledge of when he lived, other than that he was active before c. 180 CE (when Theophilus of Antioch referred to him in his Apology to Autolycus). The one, who is supposed to have said that Thallus (or in Greek: Thallos) mentioned the crucifixion of Jesus, is the Christian historian Julius Africanus in the early 3rd century CE. But also Africanus’ work is missing, so his saying is in turn rendered by George Syncellus writing in the early ninth century. In Syncellus’ version, Africanus had written the following regarding the “Gospel’s” view of the darkness that fell over the world:

“Thallus calls this darkness an eclipse of the sun in the third book of his Histories, without reason it seems to me. For the Hebrews celebrate the passover on the 14th day, reckoning by the lunar calendar, and the events concerning the savior all occurred before the first day of the Passover. But an eclipse of the sun happens when the moon creeps under the sun, and this is impossible at any other time but between the first day of the moon’s waxing and the day before that, when the new moon begins. So how are we to believe that an eclipse happened when the moon was diametrically opposite the sun?”

Now, Carrier believes that Thallus never wrote such a thing and that Eusebius actually quotes Thallus verbatim on this issue and thereby proves that to be the case.

Carrier emphasizes that Syncellus/Africanus does not say that Thallus mentioned Jesus, only that Thallus would have called the darkness that happened at Jesus’ death an eclipse of the sun – which just as easily could be interpreted as if Thallus mentioned an eclipse and Africanus thought that it was that one which occurred when Jesus hung on the cross.

In dating Thallus, Carrier rejects the information on this given by Eusebius in his Chronicle. The relevant information in that book is preserved in only an Armenian translation and there Eusebius says that Thallus dealt with events up until the 167th Olympiad, which ended in 109 BCE, more than a century before the time of Christ. Since Thallus probably would have written about later events, had he been writing in the first or second century CE, Eusebius seems to suggest that he was writing ca 100 BCE. This would then indicate that Thallus could not have written about a solar eclipse in the time of Christ, long after Thallus’ own death.

Carrier therefore suggests (like many others before him) that the Armenian text was corrupted and that the original read something else. Carrier does not think that Africanus would have made such a mistake as to believe that Thallus mentioned the darkness at Jesus’ death, if Thallus in fact lived much earlier. But unlike many Christian apologetics, Carrier does not suggest that Eusebius instead originally wrote the 207th Olympiad, which ended in 52 CE and that Thallus thereby would be giving the earliest testimony to Jesus. Instead Carrier makes a point that Eusebius just as easily could have written the 217th Olympiad ending in 92 CE, the 227th Olympiad ending in 132 CE or the 237th Olympiad ending in 172 CE.

But as I have shown in this Swedish blog post: https://rogerviklund.wordpress.com/2010/12/09/thallos-och-flegon-som-jesusvittnen-del-3-%E2%80%93-den-167e-207e-eller-217e-olympiaden/, such a mistake could not easily be explained. In short, the mistake must either have been made in the original Greek or in the translation into Armenian. In Armenian the 167th Olympiad would be Ճերորդ Կերորդ Էերորդ (hundredth, sixtieth, seventh), i.e the initials ՃԿԷ = 100 + 60 + 7. The 207th is then Մերորդ Էերորդ, i.e. the initials ՄԷ = 200 + 7 and the 217th is Մերորդ Ժերորդ Էերորդ, i.e the initials ՄԺԷ = 200 + 10 + 7, and so on. In either case you must suppose two mistakes. If the mistake was made in Greek, 167 would be ρξζ, 207 would be σζ and 217 σιζ. Here as well we would have to suppose two mistakes. In fact, it would be as likely as if our 207, 217, 227 etc, would be rendered as 167 by mistake. Carrier is of course right in that if the original did not say 167 ­– it could as easily have said 217, 227, 237 as 207. But the fact is that such an error is rather unlikely to be made and is in fact suggested simply because Thallus otherwise would have died long before he could have reported about the darkness at Jesus’ crucifixion.

As I said earlier, Carrier thinks that Eusebius actually quotes Thallus. In his Chronicle Eusebius do quote a certain Phlegon, seemingly verbatim. This same Phlegon is also mentioned by Africanus, where also he is said to be witnessing the darkness that befell the earth when Jesus died. He should even have stated that the darkness occurred “in the time of Tiberius Caesar, during the full moon, a full eclipse of the sun happened, from the sixth hour until the ninth.” But in Eusebius’ quotation, Phlegon says nothing like this, but instead:

“Now, in the fourth year of the 202nd Olympiad [32 CE], a great eclipse of the sun occurred at the sixth hour [i.e. noon] that excelled every other before it, turning the day into such darkness of night that the stars could be seen in heaven, and the earth moved in Bithynia, toppling many buildings in the city of Nicaea [modern days İznik]”.

As can be seen Phlegon only mentions a solar eclipse which obviously was seen in Bithynia and an earth quake also in Bithynia, but not necessarily occurring at the same time. It happened at the sixth hour – but did of course not last until the ninth. As we nowadays can calculate the exact time when solar eclipses historically have occurred, we can tell that there was no total solar eclipse in Palestine anytime during the period of Pilate, and of course there has never been a solar eclipse at the Jewish Passover, as solar eclipses cannot occur during that festival.

But we now know when the only possible solar eclipse reported by Phlegon took place. Phlegon supposedly should have said that it occurred in the fourth year of the 202nd Olympiad. This Olympiad (the four years between the games) lasted from 28/29 to 32 CE and the fourth year should accordingly mean 32 CE. But there was only one total solar eclipse in this part of the world that would fit Phlegon’s description, and this solar eclipse happened on November 24, 29 CE along a corridor passing across Bithynia.

bithynien2

All calculations are from NASA’s Eclipse Web Site.

Only between the blue lines did the moon totally cover the sun; just for a few seconds close to the edges while the eclipse would have lasted a couple of minutes in the centre near the orange line. The sun would only have been partially darkened in Palestine and even if there was an earthquake in Bithynia, no one in Jerusalem would have noticed it; being 1080 km away. I have written more about this in the Swedish blog post Thallos och Flegon som Jesusvittnen. Del 4 – Solförmörkelsen.

Anyway, before Eusebius quotes Phlegon, he seemingly refers to [an]other source[s] and with the already cited part above, the passage goes like this:

“Jesus Christ, according to the prophecies which had been foretold, underwent his passion in the 18th year of Tiberius [32 CE]. Also at that time in other Greek compendiums we find an event recorded in these words: ‘the sun was eclipsed, Bithynia was struck by an earthquake, and in the city of Nicaea many buildings fell’”. All these things happened to occur during the Lord’s passion. In fact, Phlegon, too, a distinguished reckoner of Olympiads, wrote more on these events in his 13th book, saying this: ‘Now, in the fourth year of the 202nd Olympiad [32 CE], a great eclipse of the sun occurred at the sixth hour [i.e. noon] that excelled every other before it, turning the day into such darkness of night that the stars could be seen in heaven, and the earth moved in Bithynia, toppling many buildings in the city of Nicaea’”.

It is in these “other Greek compendiums” that Thallus is hidden, according to Carrier’s theory. He gives two major reasons for believing this.

First, the Greek for “other” is allos (ἄλλος) and Thallus’ Greek name was Thallos (θαλλοσ). Hence, the original θαλλοῦ (Thallou) would according to this theory have been altered into ἄλλοις “since only two errors are required to alter the one to the other (the loss of a theta, and a confusion or ‘emendation’ converting an upsilon to iota-sigma”).

Second, even if Eusebius meant “other Greek compendiums”, also these must have included Thallus’ testimony, as 1) “Eusebius used a chronology of Thallus as a source, and […] it was almost certainly the very same Histories cited by Africanus”, and 2) “Eusebius would certainly have quoted Thallus here” if “Thallus mentioned the eclipse in connection with Jesus”.

The latter reason is, in my opinion, a stronger argument. But if we shall presume that Eusebios originally wrote Thallos, we have to suppose two things which by themselves are not that likely. 1) That two letters (figures) were accidentally altered into 167 and two letters (Th and u) in Thallou were dropped and two letters (o and i) were added to form the word allois. Even if Carrier is correct and it would just require the “loss of a theta, and a confusion or ‘emendation’ converting an upsilon to iota-sigma” it would still be two errors.

In Thallus: An Analysis Carrier is arguing the exact opposite to this, namely that ALLOS was not originally THALLOS in the writings of Josephus (Antiquities of the Jews 18.167). The reading Thallos is in fact an addition to the text; an addition made in the eighteenth century, changing ALLOS (other) into THALLOS, while all the manuscripts simply has ALLOS. In this case Carrier argues that “there is no good basis for this conjecture. First, the Greek actually does make sense without the added letter (it means ‘another’), and all extant early translations confirm this very reading. Second, an epitome of this passage does not give a name but instead the generic ‘someone,’ which suggests that no name was mentioned in the epitomizer’s copy.”

Even though Carrier’s theory is possible, and he is certainly right in stating that Thallus did not mention a solar eclipse at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, the most obvious interpretation still seems to be that Eusebius wrote “167” and “other” – which is exactly what Boman suggests.

Regarding the possible Greek corruptions of the number of the Olympiads, Boman writes the following:

”However, if the text was uncorrupted in the Greek exemplar and the corruption occurred either when the text was translated into Armenian or when the Armenian text was copied, speculations regarding plausible scribal errors in Greek will not be of any use.”

One of Carrier’s arguments is that “Thallus most likely wrote in the 2nd century, since pagan notice of the Gospels is unattested before that century”. But as Boman notices, Carrier doesn’t think that Thallus was responding to any Christian claim, and then this argument falls flat. We accordingly don’t know when Thallus wrote other than the fact that he is being referred to by c. 180 CE and accordingly must have lived before that. However, this does not mean that he must have live shortly before 180 CE since nothing he is said to have written about (apart from the darkness at the death of Christ) took place in the Common Era.

So, Thallus wrote before 180 CE, and if he correctly reported of a darkness at the time of Jesus’ death, he wrote after 30 CE. But Boman says that if “it were not for Africanus’ claim regarding the crucifixion darkness, Thallus … could have been writing in the 1st century BC.” And it is quite likely that Africanus has twisted both Phlegon’s and Thallus’ statements, so how much trust should we put on Africanus for being able to date Thallus’ report? It could of course also – as I have suggested in the Swedish blog post Thallos och Flegon som Jesusvittnen. Del 6 – Är Flegon hos Africanus ett tillägg? – be that the passage on Phlegon in Africanus is a later addition. If so, Africanus has of course not twisted Phlegon’s statement.

Regarding what other Greek compendiums Eusebius could have meant if he did not think of Thallus, Boman refers to Nataniel Lardner, who suggests that Eusebius first of all meant only One Greek compendium and that this was the one by Phlegon whom he directly afterwards quotes and thereafter says:

“‘so writes the forenamed man.’ […] To me it appears exceeding manifest that Eusebius [and thus also Jerome] speaks of one writer only, meaning Phlegon the compiler of the Olympiads.”(The Works of Nathaniel Lardner, D. D.: With a Life by Dr. Kippis in ten volumes, VII, London 1838, 108.)

Boman continues:

“As Carrier himself says, the Greek could refer to one single pagan work – such as the Olympiads by Phlegon. The word “other” (ἄλλοις) could have been written by Eusebius to emphasize that there were other testimonies than the Christian

There are two feeble arguments in Boman’s theory. One is the fact that Africanus would have been fooled to think that Thallus wrote about a darkness at the time of Jesus, if he in fact was living more than a century earlier. The other is the not so straightforward reading and obvious interpretation of Eusebius’ testimony as referring to only Phlegon. Boman calls Lardner’s theory “not improbable”, but that of course does not make it probable.

On the other hand, with Boman’s theory there is no need to suggest double alterations of both ALLOS and 167, which in both cases must presuppose two errors each. Boman’s theory deals with the text more or less as it has come down to us. Although not a fully satisfactory explanation, Boman’s suggestion “that Africanus referred to Thallus from memory … and confused him with Phlegon” involves at least fewer assumptions and we know that people often quoted from memory and that it was far from unusual that their memory failed them.

CARRIER’s and BOMAN’s comments

Carrier made some comments on Boman’s article and Boman did in turn reply to this. The exchange can be found here on Carrier’s blog and since these comments are to some degree enlightening, I will also make some comments on their comments.

Carrier’s main objection against Boman’s thesis concerns one of the objections also made by me – the not so straightforward reading of Eusebius as referring to only Phlegon. He makes three objections to that:

1)      If “other” (allois) “was written by Eusebius to emphasize that there were other testimonies than the Christian” then there has to be at least one earlier “reference to Christian testimonies” in the text – which there according to Carries isn’t. Carrier rejects Boman’s “reference to ‘prophecies’ foretelling the year of Christ’s passion”, since “one would not say ‘other’ in respect to that unless you meant other prophecies.”

2)      The second objections is linguistic, and Carrier claims that Eusebius’ εὕρομεν ἱστορούμενα κατὰ λέξιν ταῦτα (heuromen historeumena kata lexin tauta) “is an introduction of an exact quotation”. The Greek “kata lexin” is according to Carrier an idiom for “as the phrase goes”. And “κατὰ λέξιν” for sure means word for word or verbatim. So according to Carrier, this cannot “be followed by a summary or a paraphrase”, which it would have to be if Boman is correct.

3)      The third objection is also linguistic. Eusebius continues by writing: γράφει δὲ καὶ Φλέγων … (graphei de kai Phlegôn …); i.e “and also Phlegon … wrote”; adding “about these same things” and “in these words”, introducing Phlegon for the first time and directly thereafter quoting him. This suggests, according to Carrier, that the previous “other compendiums”, cannot refer to Phlegon.

Boman counters the first point, by claiming that there are indeed earlier references to Christian testimonies. He quotes the Latin translation of Jerome as this is older than the Greek excerpt in Syncellus. And in this Latin text “there is a direct reference to the Christian Gospels just (not even 40 words) before the reference to ‘other’ testimonies.” So if we are to trust the accuracy of the older Latin text, there is indeed at least one earlier reference to Christian testimonies in the text and so, contrary to Carrier’s opinion, “other” (allois) could have been Eusebius’ way to refer to other testimonies than the Christian.

The linguistic arguments made by Carrier are though intriguing and not so easily dismissed. I.e especially the phrase “kata lexin”, which normally intrudes direct quotations. Consider for instance Clement of Alexandria as he introduces the longer “quotation” from the Secret Gospel of Mark:

ἀμέλει μετὰ τὸ· ἦσαν δὲ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ἀναβαίνοντες εἰς Ἰεροσόλυμα· καὶ τὰ καὶ τὰ ἐξῆς ἕως· μετὰ τρεῖς ἡμέρας ἀναστήσεται· ὧδε ἐπιφέρει κατὰ λέξιν· καὶ ἔρχονται εἰς βηθανίαν …

For example, after “And they were in the road going up to Jerusalem,” and what follows, until “After three days he shall arise,” it says like this word for word: “And they are coming to Bethany …

So, we have two rivaling views leading ultimately to the same conclusion, albeit not arrived to by the same process; namely that Thallus never wrote about any darkness in connection to the death of Jesus. But of course we already knew that there was no total solar eclipse in Jerusalem at all during the time of Pilate and accordingly Thallus could not have written about any. In fact there has only been three total eclipses in Jerusalem during the last two thousand years, that is the rarity of such events. The first one occurred on December 27 in 83 CE and it lasted 1 minute and 33 seconds. The others occurred on March 10 in 601 CE and August 20 in 993 CE.

There has though been a number of partial sun eclipses in Jerusalem during the period Jesus is supposed to have been crucified; the period 26–36 CE. They were as follows:

Date Type Start Max End
06 Feb 26 CE Partial 07:24:07 08:40:37 10:08:33
26 Jan 27 CE Partial 16:35:06 17:06:20 17:07(s)
24 Nov 29 CE Partial 09:22:15 10:44:13 12:12:06
28 Apr 32 CE Partial 07:28:14 07:47:21 08:06:51
12 Sep 33 CE Partial 10:54:49 11:58:21 12:59:29
01 Sep 34 CE Partial 11:46:40 12:58:19 14:06:27

As can be seen, there were only partial solar eclipses in Jerusalem during this period (none of which would have made it dark enough), and of course none during the Jewish Passover as it always is celebrated at a time when there can be no solar eclipses.

So, who is right then, Carrier or Boman?

Carrier suggests that we in fact have the very words of Thallus reported by Eusebius and that we therefore know that he never mentioned Jesus in connection to a solar eclipse. In order to believe this we need to suppose two distortions of the text, both including double mistakes.

With Boman’s theory we do not need to suppose any alterations to this part of the text. Yet we need to understand why Eusebios would not be quoting although he specifically says he does, and I guess we also need to suppose that the part about Phlegon in Julius Africanus is a later interpolation, as it otherwise would be strange that he first calls Phlegon Thallus but in the next sentence gets it right.

Anyhow, Thallus never mentioned Jesus and accordingly is no witness to him either.

Roger Viklund, July 9, 2013

Timo’s and my article on-line

Since I believe knowledge is to be shared, I decided to make Timo Paananen’s and my article available on-line, in accordance with the conditions set up by Brill:

Permitted use of Articles from Journals, Multi-Authored Books and Encyclopedias

  • A Brill author may post the post-print version of his or her own article that appeared in a journal or multi-authored book volume or encyclopedia on his or her own personal website or webpage free of charge. This means the article can be shown exactly as it appears in print. No permission is required.

http://www.brill.com/open-access-policy

So here it is:

Distortion of the Scribal Hand in the Images of Clement’s Letter to Theodore, Vigiliae Christianae 67 (2013), 235-247”.

Roger Viklund, June 27, 2013

« Older entries